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Kamala Thiagarajan
Kamala Thiagarajan
Kamala Thiagarajan is a freelance journalist based in Madurai, southern India. She reports on human interest, health, development, gender issues and has been published in the New York Times, BBC, The Atlantic, The Guardian, Al Jazeera, NPR’s Goats & Soda and more.

As people, businesses and services in Asia increasingly operate online, regulatory frameworks to safeguard private data are proving inadequate. Discrepancies in levels of protection across the region also highlight the need for a more unified approach.

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People rely on antibiotics far too much for common illnesses like colds and sore throats, a new study finds. It’s why antimicrobial resistance has become a leading killer worldwide.

While the offer is open to other countries, it is most applicable to China, given its dominance in Indian electronics. But it remains to be seen whether such a partnership can bolster Indian electronics manufacturing or give greater security to Chinese companies in India

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Shutting Chinese phones out of the lower segment of the market, in an effort to protect the domestic industry, would hurt not only Chinese companies but also Indian consumers.

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Street art has spread through Scotland’s biggest city, from giant murals like one inspired by the movie Honey, I Shrunk the Kids to ones of Glasgow’s patron saints. Covid-19 and climate change inspire some artists.

While Apple has staunchly continued its reliance on Chinese manufacturing, China’s Covid-19 policies have emerged as a potential deal-breaker. Apple has been testing the waters in India for years – the pandemic and China-US tensions might provide the impetus for a bigger shift.

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Critics warn that Nepal risks being another indebted country facing economic ruin if it accepts loans from China, in the wake of the Sri Lanka’s debt troubles. In Nepal, the Chinese infrastructure initiative is increasingly seen in the context of US-China rivalry.

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Older generations of Indians who grew up on a steady diet of Soviet-era literature harbour a soft spot for Russia and a mistrust of the West. The young, by contrast, have seen their peers evacuated by the thousands from Ukraine to escape Russian aggression.

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After months of working from home during the pandemic, many employees are anxious about returning to the office. Experts and returnees share tips on making the transition.

Zoom fatigue, caused by too much videoconferencing, can lead to insomnia, exhaustion and the feeling of being trapped. Experts suggest ways to reduce its negative health impacts.

Restricting the certificate to only those inoculated with four EU-approved jabs exacerbates the vaccine inequality already perpetuated by the West.

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Just as travel bans have failed to keep coronavirus variants out of countries, vaccine nationalism will fail, too. The longer the wider world remains unvaccinated, the more variants are going to spread. Some may not be as responsive to current vaccines.

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Families stuck at home in the pandemic are playing more board games. New ones with historical, cultural and environmental messages are rising in popularity.

A number of Indian artists in Hong Kong are transcending borders and having an impact on the city’s art scene, from outdoor murals to being represented in the annual Affordable Art Fair.

It takes stamina, courage, and agility to climb up and down coconut palms all day harvesting the nuts. Thankfully, in southern India new equipment has made the job safer – so much so that women now do it.

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Sales of personal care products, from soap and eye gel to shampoo and toothpaste made from cow dung and urine are growing. And that’s not all. In bovine-mad India, art made from dung is popular too.

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India has four major coral reefs and the Gulf of Mannar in Tamil Nadu is home to 117 species of coral. Global warming and recent heatwaves have damaged the reefs, but a new transplanting method offers hope.

In southern India parrot astrology, using specially trained parakeets that draw tarot cards from a deck, is a centuries-old tradition. But astrologers are having their birds confiscated amid efforts to protect the creatures.