Lam Woon-Kwong

Lam Woon-Kwong

Latest from Lam Woon-Kwong

Dark legacy of Britain’s opium wars still felt today amid fight against drug addiction and trafficking
With limited policy options, character counts in race for Hong Kong’s top job
Empress Wu Zetian: An example of female power which remains relevant today
Has the world forgotten the terrible lesson of Kristallnacht?
Why public popularity is the key card for politicians playing power games
History repeated: the worst of the 2008 crisis is yet to come
Creative business solutions all down to connecting the dots
100 years on, leaders and citizens alike must heed the lessons of Europe’s ‘Great War’
On Second Thought: the making of a great inventor
On Second Thought: Taking pride in our shared experience is nothing to be ashamed of
War on flu: learning from the deadly epidemics of the past
Beijing follows the route well travelled by Admiral Zheng He in its belt and road initiative
Lessons from 1966: why we should never forget the disastrous consequences of the Cultural Revolution
Bruce Lee, a global hero who epitomised Hong Kong's strengths - it's just a pity the city could not preserve his former home
On Second Thought: Qing-era warship contains a vital lesson for today's military tensions
On Second Thought: 70 years on, the world has still not learnt lessons of war

By the time Hitler raided Poland in 1939, starting the second world war, China had been fighting Japan for eight years

11 Sep 2015 - 3:50AM
On Second Thought: 70 years on, the world has still not learnt lessons of war

By the time Hitler raided Poland in 1939, starting the second world war, China had been fighting Japan for eight years

Lessons must be learned from the different approaches of Martin Luther King and Malcolm X
How Adlai Stevenson proved power of compromise in Cuban missile crisis

Half a century ago in 1965, four exceptional personalities passed away: Winston Churchill, T.S. Eliot, Nat King Cole and Adlai Stevenson. Most would agree the first three were among the top of their lots. Many, however, would wonder why Stevenson ranks in the same category.

15 May 2015 - 2:14AM
How Adlai Stevenson proved power of compromise in Cuban missile crisis

Half a century ago in 1965, four exceptional personalities passed away: Winston Churchill, T.S. Eliot, Nat King Cole and Adlai Stevenson. Most would agree the first three were among the top of their lots. Many, however, would wonder why Stevenson ranks in the same category.

Hong Kong can learn from Spanish experience on road to democracy
Pragmatism and wisdom can help us shape a better future together
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