Lea Li

Hong Kong

Lea Li

Video Producer

Lea Li joined the Post in 2016 and specialises in the video production of news and features. His reporting covers political and social issues in China and Hong Kong. His work was recognised with an honorable mention in the Excellence in Video Reporting category at the 2018 Society of Publishers in Asia Awards. He holds a master's degree in multimedia and entertainment technology from The Hong Kong Polytechnic University.

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Latest from Lea Li

Hong Kong shut down by Typhoon Kompasu, second severe storm to lash the city in less than a week

At least seven people were injured and one death tentatively being blamed on Typhoon Kompasu as it lashed Hong Kong on October 12-13, 2021. It was the second major storm to hit the city in less than a week. Classes were cancelled, trading suspended and much of the city shut down as a result of the storm.

At least seven people were injured and one death tentatively being blamed on Typhoon Kompasu as it lashed Hong Kong on October 12-13, 2021. It was the second major storm to hit the city in less than a week. Classes were cancelled, trading suspended and much of the city shut down as a result of the storm.

Hong Kong shut down by Typhoon Kompasu, second severe storm to lash the city in less than a week
13 Oct 2021 - 5:06PM
‘It’s still the Hong Kong I like’: mainland Chinese on how they feel in the city after social unrest

It has been over a year since Beijing imposed a national security law on Hong Kong that critics say severely limits the freedom of the city’s residents. Since then, thousands of Hongkongers have chosen to emigrate to countries such as the UK, which has offered them a new path to citizenship. A number of notable pro-democracy activists have fled fearing they’ll be targeted by authorities. Many expatriates have also chosen to return to their home countries, citing changes to Hong Kong’s political climate. But not everyone is choosing to leave the place that they’ve called home for many years. In late 2021, the Post spoke to some mainland Chinese who have chosen to stay on in Hong Kong, saying they remain optimistic about the city’s future.

It has been over a year since Beijing imposed a national security law on Hong Kong that critics say severely limits the freedom of the city’s residents. Since then, thousands of Hongkongers have chosen to emigrate to countries such as the UK, which has offered them a new path to citizenship. A number of notable pro-democracy activists have fled fearing they’ll be targeted by authorities. Many expatriates have also chosen to return to their home countries, citing changes to Hong Kong’s political climate. But not everyone is choosing to leave the place that they’ve called home for many years. In late 2021, the Post spoke to some mainland Chinese who have chosen to stay on in Hong Kong, saying they remain optimistic about the city’s future.

‘It’s still the Hong Kong I like’: mainland Chinese on how they feel in the city after social unrest
9 Oct 2021 - 10:00AM
Hong Kong yacht club and charity team up to help special needs teens learn dragon boating

The Royal Hong Kong Yacht Club has partnered with local charity Love 21 Foundation to launch a dragon boat training programme for teenagers with Down’s syndrome and autism. The 13-member youth team competed against other paddlers on September 26, 2021, after completing a five-week training course. Through the programme, organisers aim to help teens with special needs to improve their social skills and focus.

The Royal Hong Kong Yacht Club has partnered with local charity Love 21 Foundation to launch a dragon boat training programme for teenagers with Down’s syndrome and autism. The 13-member youth team competed against other paddlers on September 26, 2021, after completing a five-week training course. Through the programme, organisers aim to help teens with special needs to improve their social skills and focus.

Hong Kong yacht club and charity team up to help special needs teens learn dragon boating
30 Sep 2021 - 2:35PM
How to make traditional mooncakes with five-star hotel dim sum master chef Tse Sun-fuk

Every year ahead of the Mid-Autumn Festival, Chinese chefs at restaurants, hotels and bakeries in Hong Kong are busy coming up with new flavours for mooncakes, with twists including egg custard, chocolate or ice cream, and even some made with durian. But people who prefer traditional mooncakes may be surprised to learn that they are not that difficult to make at home. Tse Sun-fuk, dim sum chef at the Cordis Hotel in Hong Kong, showed the SCMP’s Bernice Chan how to bake mooncakes with white lotus seed paste and two egg yolks.

Every year ahead of the Mid-Autumn Festival, Chinese chefs at restaurants, hotels and bakeries in Hong Kong are busy coming up with new flavours for mooncakes, with twists including egg custard, chocolate or ice cream, and even some made with durian. But people who prefer traditional mooncakes may be surprised to learn that they are not that difficult to make at home. Tse Sun-fuk, dim sum chef at the Cordis Hotel in Hong Kong, showed the SCMP’s Bernice Chan how to bake mooncakes with white lotus seed paste and two egg yolks.

How to make traditional mooncakes with five-star hotel dim sum master chef Tse Sun-fuk
18 Sep 2021 - 8:00AM
Hong Kong primary school plants Japan’s ‘Miyawaki forest’ to help cool city

Rising temperatures sparked by global warming have led to an even hotter urban climate, created by the so-called heat island effect. Hong Kong-based social enterprise Nature Makers Lab is seeking to help ease the effects of warm air trapped in urban spaces by planting mini forests around the city that also promote biodiversity. Based on a system invented by Japanese botanist Akira Miyawaki, Hong Kong’s first dense mini-forest project was carried out with the help of a group of primary school pupils.

Rising temperatures sparked by global warming have led to an even hotter urban climate, created by the so-called heat island effect. Hong Kong-based social enterprise Nature Makers Lab is seeking to help ease the effects of warm air trapped in urban spaces by planting mini forests around the city that also promote biodiversity. Based on a system invented by Japanese botanist Akira Miyawaki, Hong Kong’s first dense mini-forest project was carried out with the help of a group of primary school pupils.

Hong Kong primary school plants Japan’s ‘Miyawaki forest’ to help cool city
12 Sep 2021 - 11:59AM
The Hong Kong restaurant offering free ‘fortune meals’ to the needy, seven days a week

Working-class communities have been hit hard by the Covid-19 pandemic, with many struggling to feed themselves and pay rent. Catering company Gingko House, which operates several restaurants in Hong Kong, started the fook faan or “fortune meals” programme in 2017. The restaurant emphasises giving people food options regardless of their financial situation, by serving a variety of dishes.Today, with help from donors and volunteers, it provides the elderly, low-income and struggling individuals with nutritious cooked meals, every day of the year.

Working-class communities have been hit hard by the Covid-19 pandemic, with many struggling to feed themselves and pay rent. Catering company Gingko House, which operates several restaurants in Hong Kong, started the fook faan or “fortune meals” programme in 2017. The restaurant emphasises giving people food options regardless of their financial situation, by serving a variety of dishes.Today, with help from donors and volunteers, it provides the elderly, low-income and struggling individuals with nutritious cooked meals, every day of the year.

The Hong Kong restaurant offering free ‘fortune meals’ to the needy, seven days a week
5 Sep 2021 - 10:33AM
Afghan student in Hong Kong fears for family caught up in ‘heartbreaking’ crisis back home

Afghan nationals living abroad have been closely following developments in the country as the Taliban consolidates power after the final US withdrawal from Afghanistan on August 30, 2021. Among them is Hong Kong-based Sitara, who’s a member of the Hazara minority in Ghazni province and studying in the city since 2018. Sitara returned from visiting family in Afghanistan just days before the capital Kabul fell to the Taliban. The university student says she’s highly sceptical about Taliban promises to allow Afghan women to continue working and studying, and fears for the safety of her family and her country’s future. 
(Photo: SCMP / Dickson Lee)

Afghan nationals living abroad have been closely following developments in the country as the Taliban consolidates power after the final US withdrawal from Afghanistan on August 30, 2021. Among them is Hong Kong-based Sitara, who’s a member of the Hazara minority in Ghazni province and studying in the city since 2018. Sitara returned from visiting family in Afghanistan just days before the capital Kabul fell to the Taliban. The university student says she’s highly sceptical about Taliban promises to allow Afghan women to continue working and studying, and fears for the safety of her family and her country’s future. 
(Photo: SCMP / Dickson Lee)

Afghan student in Hong Kong fears for family caught up in ‘heartbreaking’ crisis back home
4 Sep 2021 - 8:00AM
Hong Kong Olympic athletes welcomed back in homecoming parade

Hong Kong celebrated the city’s historic success at the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games with a bus parade on August 19, 2021. Medallists, including swimmer Siobhan Haughey and karate exponent Grace Lau, as well as table tennis players Minnie Soo, Doo Hoi-kem and Lee Ho-ching, joined coaches and other delegation members for a ride through the city in open-top buses. Hong Kong came away with six medals at the Tokyo Games, including one gold by “Fencing God” Edgar Cheung Ka-long. The 25-year-old, who was not at the homecoming parade, was competing at the National Games in mainland China.

Hong Kong celebrated the city’s historic success at the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games with a bus parade on August 19, 2021. Medallists, including swimmer Siobhan Haughey and karate exponent Grace Lau, as well as table tennis players Minnie Soo, Doo Hoi-kem and Lee Ho-ching, joined coaches and other delegation members for a ride through the city in open-top buses. Hong Kong came away with six medals at the Tokyo Games, including one gold by “Fencing God” Edgar Cheung Ka-long. The 25-year-old, who was not at the homecoming parade, was competing at the National Games in mainland China.

Hong Kong Olympic athletes welcomed back in homecoming parade
19 Aug 2021 - 5:26PM
‘Bring your pets if you emigrate’: Hong Kong animal-rights groups urge owners not to abandon pets

The number of dogs surrendered to the animal shelter group, Hong Kong Dog Rescue (HKDR), has risen by 20-30 per cent. The group attributes the rise to the number of people leaving Hong Kong and has called on owners to take their pets with them when moving abroad. Figures from the city’s Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department (AFCD) show 262 animals were given up in the first half of 2021, but the AFCD said there has been no specific trend showing pets being surrendered because of emigration. 

The number of dogs surrendered to the animal shelter group, Hong Kong Dog Rescue (HKDR), has risen by 20-30 per cent. The group attributes the rise to the number of people leaving Hong Kong and has called on owners to take their pets with them when moving abroad. Figures from the city’s Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department (AFCD) show 262 animals were given up in the first half of 2021, but the AFCD said there has been no specific trend showing pets being surrendered because of emigration. 

‘Bring your pets if you emigrate’: Hong Kong animal-rights groups urge owners not to abandon pets
18 Aug 2021 - 10:00AM
Umbrella group behind Hong Kong’s largest protests, Civil Human Rights Front, disbands

The Civil Human Rights Front (CHRF), the pro-opposition umbrella group behind some of the largest protests in Hong Kong history, announced on Sunday, August 15, 2021, that it had disbanded. The decision came amid a police investigation into the group’s legality, with authorities questioning it over its finances and its role in a declaration submitted to the UN. Founded in 2002, the front was composed of human rights and pro-democracy groups. In the past 19 years, it has organised many mass rallies in the city, including record-breaking demonstrations during the 2019 anti-government protests, and Hong Kong’s annual July 1 march marking the day of the city’s return to China in 1997.

The Civil Human Rights Front (CHRF), the pro-opposition umbrella group behind some of the largest protests in Hong Kong history, announced on Sunday, August 15, 2021, that it had disbanded. The decision came amid a police investigation into the group’s legality, with authorities questioning it over its finances and its role in a declaration submitted to the UN. Founded in 2002, the front was composed of human rights and pro-democracy groups. In the past 19 years, it has organised many mass rallies in the city, including record-breaking demonstrations during the 2019 anti-government protests, and Hong Kong’s annual July 1 march marking the day of the city’s return to China in 1997.

Umbrella group behind Hong Kong’s largest protests, Civil Human Rights Front, disbands
15 Aug 2021 - 5:29PM
Hong Kong’s largest teachers’ union to disband after pressure from pro-establishment media

The Hong Kong Professional Teachers’ Union has announced it is disbanding after pro-establishment and state-owned media accused the group of “hijacking the education sector”. Hong Kong’s biggest teachers’ union was founded in 1974 and currently has 95,000 members. One day after the organisation announced its decision on August 10, 2021, dozens of members gathered outside its Causeway Bay service centre to show their support. 
(Photo: SCMP / Edmond So)

The Hong Kong Professional Teachers’ Union has announced it is disbanding after pro-establishment and state-owned media accused the group of “hijacking the education sector”. Hong Kong’s biggest teachers’ union was founded in 1974 and currently has 95,000 members. One day after the organisation announced its decision on August 10, 2021, dozens of members gathered outside its Causeway Bay service centre to show their support. 
(Photo: SCMP / Edmond So)

Hong Kong’s largest teachers’ union to disband after pressure from pro-establishment media
11 Aug 2021 - 6:18PM
Hong Kong opposition district councillors say farewell to constituents after mass resignation

More than 200 of Hong Kong’s district councillors, all from the opposition camp, have resigned ahead of a new oath-taking requirement that was put in place under the national security law imposed on the city by Beijing. A total of 264, or 58 per cent, of the district council seats have been left vacant because of resignations or disqualifications. The mass departure was triggered by concerns that councillors who could be disqualified under the new law would be forced to return salaries and operating allowances they had received since taking office – creating a debt of about HK$2 million (US$257,000) each.
(Photo: SCMP / Felix Wong)

More than 200 of Hong Kong’s district councillors, all from the opposition camp, have resigned ahead of a new oath-taking requirement that was put in place under the national security law imposed on the city by Beijing. A total of 264, or 58 per cent, of the district council seats have been left vacant because of resignations or disqualifications. The mass departure was triggered by concerns that councillors who could be disqualified under the new law would be forced to return salaries and operating allowances they had received since taking office – creating a debt of about HK$2 million (US$257,000) each.
(Photo: SCMP / Felix Wong)

Hong Kong opposition district councillors say farewell to constituents after mass resignation
8 Aug 2021 - 8:00AM
Hong Kong celebrates another historic Olympic win as swimmer Siobhan Haughey takes silver

Hong Kong athlete Siobhan Haughey made history on July 28, 2021, with her silver medal win in the women’s 200m freestyle swimming final at the Tokyo Olympic Games. The 23-year-old, the daughter of a Hong Kong mother and Irish father, was the first swimmer from the city to compete in an Olympic final. Though she was 0.42 seconds behind Australian swimmer Ariarne Titmus, Haughey smashed the Asian record with a time of 1:53.92.
 

Hong Kong athlete Siobhan Haughey made history on July 28, 2021, with her silver medal win in the women’s 200m freestyle swimming final at the Tokyo Olympic Games. The 23-year-old, the daughter of a Hong Kong mother and Irish father, was the first swimmer from the city to compete in an Olympic final. Though she was 0.42 seconds behind Australian swimmer Ariarne Titmus, Haughey smashed the Asian record with a time of 1:53.92.
 

Hong Kong celebrates another historic Olympic win as swimmer Siobhan Haughey takes silver
28 Jul 2021 - 3:27PM
Man found guilty in Hong Kong’s first national security law trial

A 24-year-old former restaurant worker has been found guilty of secession and terrorism charges in Hong Kong's first case to be tried under the Beijing-imposed national security law. Leon Tong Ying-kit was found guilty of incitement to commit secession and terrorism on July 27, 2021. Tong had ridden his motorcycle into a group of police officers while carrying a flag calling for Hong Kong's "liberation" on July 1, 2020. 
 

A 24-year-old former restaurant worker has been found guilty of secession and terrorism charges in Hong Kong's first case to be tried under the Beijing-imposed national security law. Leon Tong Ying-kit was found guilty of incitement to commit secession and terrorism on July 27, 2021. Tong had ridden his motorcycle into a group of police officers while carrying a flag calling for Hong Kong's "liberation" on July 1, 2020. 
 

Man found guilty in Hong Kong’s first national security law trial
27 Jul 2021 - 8:21PM
Hong Kong celebrates Olympic win as Cheung Ka-long takes gold in fencing

Hundreds of people gathered at the APM mall in Kwun Tong in Hong Kong, as local fencer Edgar Cheung Ka-long won the men’s individual foil gold medal at the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games on July 26, 2021. Hong Kong’s first medal in Tokyo is only the city’s second-ever gold medal after windsurfer Lee Lai-shan’s historic victory at the 1996 Atlanta Games.

Hundreds of people gathered at the APM mall in Kwun Tong in Hong Kong, as local fencer Edgar Cheung Ka-long won the men’s individual foil gold medal at the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games on July 26, 2021. Hong Kong’s first medal in Tokyo is only the city’s second-ever gold medal after windsurfer Lee Lai-shan’s historic victory at the 1996 Atlanta Games.

Hong Kong celebrates Olympic win as Cheung Ka-long takes gold in fencing
27 Jul 2021 - 5:04AM
Seven students achieve perfect scores in Hong Kong's university entrance exams

Hong Kong secondary school students received the results of their university entrance exams on July 21, 2021. Seven of the 49,976 students who sat this year’s Diploma of Secondary Education (DSE) exams achieved perfect scores. This is the first year the test results were sent to students via SMS. 
 

Hong Kong secondary school students received the results of their university entrance exams on July 21, 2021. Seven of the 49,976 students who sat this year’s Diploma of Secondary Education (DSE) exams achieved perfect scores. This is the first year the test results were sent to students via SMS. 
 

Seven students achieve perfect scores in Hong Kong's university entrance exams
21 Jul 2021 - 4:58PM
National security law one year on: Hong Kong activists still testing political ‘red lines’

On June 30, 2020, mainland Chinese authorities imposed a national security law (NSL) on Hong Kong banning secession, subversion of state power, terrorism and collusion with foreign forces. In the year since, many opposition activists in the city have been arrested and charged under the legislation while others have fled overseas. 
Amid concerns about being arrested under the NSL, some opposition groups such as the Local Youth Will and Student Politicism are adapting to find ways of voicing their opinion without crossing “red lines” that could land them in legal trouble. But Student Politicism convenor Wong Yat-chin was detained again on July 1, 2021, the 24th anniversary of the Hong Kong handover, for allegedly distributing seditious fliers.
 

On June 30, 2020, mainland Chinese authorities imposed a national security law (NSL) on Hong Kong banning secession, subversion of state power, terrorism and collusion with foreign forces. In the year since, many opposition activists in the city have been arrested and charged under the legislation while others have fled overseas. 
Amid concerns about being arrested under the NSL, some opposition groups such as the Local Youth Will and Student Politicism are adapting to find ways of voicing their opinion without crossing “red lines” that could land them in legal trouble. But Student Politicism convenor Wong Yat-chin was detained again on July 1, 2021, the 24th anniversary of the Hong Kong handover, for allegedly distributing seditious fliers.
 

National security law one year on: Hong Kong activists still testing political ‘red lines’
4 Jul 2021 - 10:12AM
A subdued July 1 handover anniversary as heavy police presence seen on the streets

The streets of Hong Kong were subdued on July 1, 2021, as the former British colony marked the anniversary of its handover to Chinese sovereignty 24 years ago. The date, which this year coincided with celebrations on the mainland for the 100th anniversary of China’s ruling Communist Party, is usually a time of protest in Hong Kong. But this year, police cited pandemic concerns as they denied applications to hold a proposed march against “political suppression,” and some 10,000 officers were deployed across Hong Kong to prevent unauthorised protests. 

The streets of Hong Kong were subdued on July 1, 2021, as the former British colony marked the anniversary of its handover to Chinese sovereignty 24 years ago. The date, which this year coincided with celebrations on the mainland for the 100th anniversary of China’s ruling Communist Party, is usually a time of protest in Hong Kong. But this year, police cited pandemic concerns as they denied applications to hold a proposed march against “political suppression,” and some 10,000 officers were deployed across Hong Kong to prevent unauthorised protests. 

A subdued July 1 handover anniversary as heavy police presence seen on the streets
1 Jul 2021 - 8:51PM
‘Socialism with Chinese characteristics’ explained

From Deng Xiaoping in the 1980s to Xi Jinping today, China’s leaders have long said the country practises a unique type of socialism – “socialism with Chinese characteristics.” Framed as an adaptive, flexible socialism, it’s tailored specifically to China’s conditions and problems. Initially, the phrase meant an embrace of free markets, free enterprise and trade, to reverse the economic stagnation of the Mao Zedong years. However, current leader Xi Jinping has declared the start of a “new era”, requiring a new type of socialism with Chinese characteristics – with the clearest continuity being that the Communist Party remains large and in charge. 

From Deng Xiaoping in the 1980s to Xi Jinping today, China’s leaders have long said the country practises a unique type of socialism – “socialism with Chinese characteristics.” Framed as an adaptive, flexible socialism, it’s tailored specifically to China’s conditions and problems. Initially, the phrase meant an embrace of free markets, free enterprise and trade, to reverse the economic stagnation of the Mao Zedong years. However, current leader Xi Jinping has declared the start of a “new era”, requiring a new type of socialism with Chinese characteristics – with the clearest continuity being that the Communist Party remains large and in charge. 

‘Socialism with Chinese characteristics’ explained
26 Jun 2021 - 6:00PM
‘It’s not just a bike but a lifestyle’: Hong Kong’s lowrider fans roll out love for Chicano culture

The lowrider bike is a highly customised bicycle inspired by classic lowrider car culture which first began in the US state of California in the 1940s. Lowrider bikes, which often feature long bodies with high handlebars and curved banana seats, appeared in Los Angeles and other cities in the 1960s, alongside the cars seen as a reflection of Chicano or Mexican-American culture.  In 2017, a group of lowrider bike lovers in Hong Kong founded a fan club called lowbikerhk. They now have more than 20 members who have their own bikes and often ride together around the city to promote lowrider culture and lifestyle.

The lowrider bike is a highly customised bicycle inspired by classic lowrider car culture which first began in the US state of California in the 1940s. Lowrider bikes, which often feature long bodies with high handlebars and curved banana seats, appeared in Los Angeles and other cities in the 1960s, alongside the cars seen as a reflection of Chicano or Mexican-American culture.  In 2017, a group of lowrider bike lovers in Hong Kong founded a fan club called lowbikerhk. They now have more than 20 members who have their own bikes and often ride together around the city to promote lowrider culture and lifestyle.

‘It’s not just a bike but a lifestyle’: Hong Kong’s lowrider fans roll out love for Chicano culture
26 Jun 2021 - 8:00AM
Hong Kong tabloid Apple Daily ceases operations after top executives arrested, assets frozen

Hongkongers bought their last edition of the Apple Daily on June 24, 2021. The tabloid folded operations after its editor-in-chief, publisher and three other executives were detained on June 17 under the national security law, and its assets were frozen, leaving it unable to pay its staff's salaries. The decision to close was made by the board of directors of Next Digital, the 26-year-old tabloid’s parent company, just hours after Hong Kong’s national security police detained Apple Daily’s lead editorial writer. Yeung Ching-kee, who wrote under the pseudonym “Li Ping” was held on suspicion of conspiracy to collude with foreign forces, the latest such arrest under the Beijing-imposed legislation. Critics say the arrests and the paper's closure dealt a blow to press freedom in Hong Kong, but the city's leader Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor, insisted it was not a crackdown on the media.
 

Hongkongers bought their last edition of the Apple Daily on June 24, 2021. The tabloid folded operations after its editor-in-chief, publisher and three other executives were detained on June 17 under the national security law, and its assets were frozen, leaving it unable to pay its staff's salaries. The decision to close was made by the board of directors of Next Digital, the 26-year-old tabloid’s parent company, just hours after Hong Kong’s national security police detained Apple Daily’s lead editorial writer. Yeung Ching-kee, who wrote under the pseudonym “Li Ping” was held on suspicion of conspiracy to collude with foreign forces, the latest such arrest under the Beijing-imposed legislation. Critics say the arrests and the paper's closure dealt a blow to press freedom in Hong Kong, but the city's leader Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor, insisted it was not a crackdown on the media.
 

Hong Kong tabloid Apple Daily ceases operations after top executives arrested, assets frozen
24 Jun 2021 - 12:43PM
‘Temple Street Father’ and his life mission helping Hong Kong’s homeless

Since arriving in Hong Kong in 1985, John Wotherspoon has spent his time helping the city’s disadvantaged. The Australian priest was first posted to a Kowloon parish and on Lantau Island before spending a period of time teaching English in mainland China. In 2009, Wotherspoon moved to a subdivided flat in Yau Ma Tei’s Temple Street in Kowloon to be near the homeless. Over the years, Wotherspoon has earned the nickname “Temple Street Father” for his work with the local homeless and ex-convicts. And at the age of 74, Wotherspoon has no plans to slow down and intends to continue helping Hong Kong’s poor.
 

Since arriving in Hong Kong in 1985, John Wotherspoon has spent his time helping the city’s disadvantaged. The Australian priest was first posted to a Kowloon parish and on Lantau Island before spending a period of time teaching English in mainland China. In 2009, Wotherspoon moved to a subdivided flat in Yau Ma Tei’s Temple Street in Kowloon to be near the homeless. Over the years, Wotherspoon has earned the nickname “Temple Street Father” for his work with the local homeless and ex-convicts. And at the age of 74, Wotherspoon has no plans to slow down and intends to continue helping Hong Kong’s poor.
 

‘Temple Street Father’ and his life mission helping Hong Kong’s homeless
12 Jun 2021 - 8:00AM
Can Huawei's Harmony OS for smartphones compete with Google's Android and Apple's iOS?

Chinese smartphone maker Huawei has released its very own operating system, Harmony OS, which can be installed across an array of devices, and work as an alternative to Google's Android OS. Huawei started hyping the new system for its smartphones after losing access to Google services on the official version of Android for its new devices sold outside China, following a US ban. Huawei says Harmony OS is more versatile than the market OS leaders, Android and Apple's iOS, and created a conversion toolkit to make it easier for app developers to tweak Android apps to work on Harmony. But it faces an uphill battle to gain global market share in the OS market.

Chinese smartphone maker Huawei has released its very own operating system, Harmony OS, which can be installed across an array of devices, and work as an alternative to Google's Android OS. Huawei started hyping the new system for its smartphones after losing access to Google services on the official version of Android for its new devices sold outside China, following a US ban. Huawei says Harmony OS is more versatile than the market OS leaders, Android and Apple's iOS, and created a conversion toolkit to make it easier for app developers to tweak Android apps to work on Harmony. But it faces an uphill battle to gain global market share in the OS market.

Can Huawei's Harmony OS for smartphones compete with Google's Android and Apple's iOS?
4 Jun 2021 - 4:25PM
Hong Kong’s biggest opposition alliance, the Civil Human Rights Front, faces government ban

The Hong Kong government is considering banning the city’s biggest opposition alliance, the Civil Human Rights Front (CHRF). Set up 19 years ago to oppose a proposed anti-subversion law in 2002, the cross-political group organised many of the pro-democracy demonstrations in the city, including the 2019 mass protests and the annual July 1 marches. That was until the Covid-19 pandemic halted most large gatherings and Beijing imposed a national security law in Hong Kong. Front convenor Figo Chan Ho-wun is among 10 people who face possible jail terms after pleading guilty to taking part in an unauthorised assembly on October 1, 2019, China's National Day. Chan spoke to the Post about his journey with the organisation, and as potentially the last Front convenor, he expressed faith in Hong Kong people, encouraging them to keep fighting for democracy even if the group is disbanded.

The Hong Kong government is considering banning the city’s biggest opposition alliance, the Civil Human Rights Front (CHRF). Set up 19 years ago to oppose a proposed anti-subversion law in 2002, the cross-political group organised many of the pro-democracy demonstrations in the city, including the 2019 mass protests and the annual July 1 marches. That was until the Covid-19 pandemic halted most large gatherings and Beijing imposed a national security law in Hong Kong. Front convenor Figo Chan Ho-wun is among 10 people who face possible jail terms after pleading guilty to taking part in an unauthorised assembly on October 1, 2019, China's National Day. Chan spoke to the Post about his journey with the organisation, and as potentially the last Front convenor, he expressed faith in Hong Kong people, encouraging them to keep fighting for democracy even if the group is disbanded.

Hong Kong’s biggest opposition alliance, the Civil Human Rights Front, faces government ban
28 May 2021 - 12:38PM
Boy band Mirror with idol Keung To lead Hong Kong Canto-pop revival after protests and pandemic

Hong Kong was Asia’s music entertainment leader during the 1980s and 1990s, only to see its influence wane over the years due to competition from South Korean, Taiwan and Chinese mainland artists. But following Hong Kong’s civil unrest in 2019 and the Covid-19 pandemic, new Canto-pop stars have emerged, including Keung To, the most popular member of the Hong Kong boy band Mirror. The 12-member group has a devoted following among angst-ridden Hongkongers worried about their future and cultural identity. 

Hong Kong was Asia’s music entertainment leader during the 1980s and 1990s, only to see its influence wane over the years due to competition from South Korean, Taiwan and Chinese mainland artists. But following Hong Kong’s civil unrest in 2019 and the Covid-19 pandemic, new Canto-pop stars have emerged, including Keung To, the most popular member of the Hong Kong boy band Mirror. The 12-member group has a devoted following among angst-ridden Hongkongers worried about their future and cultural identity. 

Boy band Mirror with idol Keung To lead Hong Kong Canto-pop revival after protests and pandemic
21 May 2021 - 11:32AM
Former Disney ‘Lion King’ dancer turns Hong Kong Chinese-pop singer

Eli Zaelo moved to Hong Kong from her native South Africa in 2015 when she landed the role of Nala in The Lion King musical. Inspired by Chinese-pop, which is a blend of Mando-pop and Canto-pop, the 27-year-old decided to become a Chinese-language singer. She has since released two original songs on her YouTube channel, with the goal of helping to bridge the cultural gap between Africa and Asia, while joining the global trend of learning Chinese.
 

Eli Zaelo moved to Hong Kong from her native South Africa in 2015 when she landed the role of Nala in The Lion King musical. Inspired by Chinese-pop, which is a blend of Mando-pop and Canto-pop, the 27-year-old decided to become a Chinese-language singer. She has since released two original songs on her YouTube channel, with the goal of helping to bridge the cultural gap between Africa and Asia, while joining the global trend of learning Chinese.
 

Former Disney ‘Lion King’ dancer turns Hong Kong Chinese-pop singer
7 May 2021 - 8:00AM
Hong Kong domestic helpers slam ‘discriminatory’ Covid-19 rules

All foreign domestic helpers in Hong Kong must be vaccinated before they can renew their work contracts, according to the government which announced the new measures on April 30, 2021. It has also ordered all helpers to undergo mandatory Covid-19 testing by May 9, 2021, after a 39-year-old domestic worker was confirmed to be the first untraceable local case of a mutated strain of Covid-19. The compulsory testing and vaccination order have caused an uproar among the city’s 370,000 foreign domestic helpers, with some accusing the arrangement as “discriminatory”.

All foreign domestic helpers in Hong Kong must be vaccinated before they can renew their work contracts, according to the government which announced the new measures on April 30, 2021. It has also ordered all helpers to undergo mandatory Covid-19 testing by May 9, 2021, after a 39-year-old domestic worker was confirmed to be the first untraceable local case of a mutated strain of Covid-19. The compulsory testing and vaccination order have caused an uproar among the city’s 370,000 foreign domestic helpers, with some accusing the arrangement as “discriminatory”.

Hong Kong domestic helpers slam ‘discriminatory’ Covid-19 rules
3 May 2021 - 5:43PM
From asylum seeker to banker: Zimbabwean in Hong Kong pays it forward

Innocent Mutanga fled his home in Zimbabwe to Hong Kong in 2013 as a political refugee.
After at first ending up sleeping on the streets, Innocent found a way to overcome his challenges and enrol in a local university before eventually becoming the first asylum seeker to graduate from a Hong Kong tertiary institution. Now an investment banker, Innocent has been paying it forward by helping other asylum seekers process their claims in Hong Kong, which does not recognise refugee status. Innocent is also helping to raise awareness about African culture and break racial stereotypes about the community through a social enterprise he set up.
 

Innocent Mutanga fled his home in Zimbabwe to Hong Kong in 2013 as a political refugee.
After at first ending up sleeping on the streets, Innocent found a way to overcome his challenges and enrol in a local university before eventually becoming the first asylum seeker to graduate from a Hong Kong tertiary institution. Now an investment banker, Innocent has been paying it forward by helping other asylum seekers process their claims in Hong Kong, which does not recognise refugee status. Innocent is also helping to raise awareness about African culture and break racial stereotypes about the community through a social enterprise he set up.
 

From asylum seeker to banker: Zimbabwean in Hong Kong pays it forward
12 Apr 2021 - 11:44AM
Hiking Hong Kong’s MacLehose Trail

Hong Kong’s first and longest hiking route, the MacLehose Trail, was opened on October 26, 1979. It was named after the city’s longest-serving colonial governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, an avid hiker who established the city’s country parks. In 2016, the 100km (62 mile) path was listed as one of the world’s best hikes by the National Geographic Society. This year, the beloved trail was embraced by even more hikers amid the Covid-19 pandemic, which caused border closures and the suspension of travel. Follow in the footsteps of Mark Agnew, South China Morning Post reporter, to explore the stunning and spectacular views on Hong Kong’s most popular hiking trail.

Hong Kong’s first and longest hiking route, the MacLehose Trail, was opened on October 26, 1979. It was named after the city’s longest-serving colonial governor, Sir Murray MacLehose, an avid hiker who established the city’s country parks. In 2016, the 100km (62 mile) path was listed as one of the world’s best hikes by the National Geographic Society. This year, the beloved trail was embraced by even more hikers amid the Covid-19 pandemic, which caused border closures and the suspension of travel. Follow in the footsteps of Mark Agnew, South China Morning Post reporter, to explore the stunning and spectacular views on Hong Kong’s most popular hiking trail.

Hiking Hong Kong’s MacLehose Trail
9 Apr 2021 - 11:08AM
Hong Kong suspends BioNTech Covid-19 vaccines ‘as precaution’ over defective packaging

Hong Kong has temporarily cancelled bookings at all 21 community vaccination centres providing the BioNTech jab. The suspension will be in effect until further notice, after the vaccine’s Chinese distributor, Fosun Pharma, notified Hong Kong and Macau of a batch found with packaging defects. Dozens of people had already been inoculated with vaccines from the specified batch at some centres ahead of the suspension notice being issued on the morning of March 24, 2021.

Hong Kong has temporarily cancelled bookings at all 21 community vaccination centres providing the BioNTech jab. The suspension will be in effect until further notice, after the vaccine’s Chinese distributor, Fosun Pharma, notified Hong Kong and Macau of a batch found with packaging defects. Dozens of people had already been inoculated with vaccines from the specified batch at some centres ahead of the suspension notice being issued on the morning of March 24, 2021.

Hong Kong suspends BioNTech Covid-19 vaccines ‘as precaution’ over defective packaging
24 Mar 2021 - 6:04PM