Lea Li

Hong Kong

Lea Li

Video Producer

Lea Li joined the Post in 2016 and specialises in the video production of news and features. His reporting covers political and social issues in China and Hong Kong. His work was recognised with an honorable mention in the Excellence in Video Reporting category at the 2018 Society of Publishers in Asia Awards. He holds a master's degree in multimedia and entertainment technology from The Hong Kong Polytechnic University.

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Latest from Lea Li

Coronavirus: How close is Hong Kong to a fourth wave of Covid-19?

When the Covid-19 pandemic started in January 2020, many around the world saw Hong Kong as an example of how communities could successfully contain the novel coronavirus that causes the disease. But the city has seen infections rise several times, including a third wave in July that prompted a tightening of social-distancing rules with financially painful caps on the number of people allowed to gather, drink and dine together. The Hong Kong government organised a mass-testing scheme in September, but only found 42 cases among 1.78 million people who participated. While the city has since then managed to get daily local infection numbers down to at or near zero, new clusters in October have sparked fears of a possible fourth wave.

20 Oct 2020 - 6:05PM

When the Covid-19 pandemic started in January 2020, many around the world saw Hong Kong as an example of how communities could successfully contain the novel coronavirus that causes the disease. But the city has seen infections rise several times, including a third wave in July that prompted a tightening of social-distancing rules with financially painful caps on the number of people allowed to gather, drink and dine together. The Hong Kong government organised a mass-testing scheme in September, but only found 42 cases among 1.78 million people who participated. While the city has since then managed to get daily local infection numbers down to at or near zero, new clusters in October have sparked fears of a possible fourth wave.

Coronavirus: How close is Hong Kong to a fourth wave of Covid-19?
Butterfly paradise under threat from land development projects in Hong Kong

Hong Kong is home to more than 260 butterfly species, including varieties from southern China, East Asia and South Asia. But their numbers are dwindling as butterfly habitats are being destroyed by land development projects. Green Power, a local NGO, has been leading a butterfly conservation programme that aims to record the living conditions of the beautiful flying insects, and to promote ecological education among Hong Kong people.
(Photo: SCMP / Nora Tam)

15 Oct 2020 - 8:00AM

Hong Kong is home to more than 260 butterfly species, including varieties from southern China, East Asia and South Asia. But their numbers are dwindling as butterfly habitats are being destroyed by land development projects. Green Power, a local NGO, has been leading a butterfly conservation programme that aims to record the living conditions of the beautiful flying insects, and to promote ecological education among Hong Kong people.
(Photo: SCMP / Nora Tam)

Butterfly paradise under threat from land development projects in Hong Kong
Nangka sets record for farthest cyclone to trigger a No 8 signal in Hong Kong it skirts by city

The Hong Kong Observatory issued a No 8 typhoon signal and kept it in place for most of the day on October 13, 2020, as tropical storm Nangka slowly passed about 450km (280 miles) to the southwest of the city. Nangka’s track was the furthest away from Hong Kong in 60 years of record-keeping to trigger the city’s third-highest storm alert. The signal led to closures of schools, restaurants and shopping malls, and suspension of public transport around the city. The typhoon signal was expected to be downgraded to a No 3 by the evening, as Nangka approached Hainan Island.

13 Oct 2020 - 6:37PM

The Hong Kong Observatory issued a No 8 typhoon signal and kept it in place for most of the day on October 13, 2020, as tropical storm Nangka slowly passed about 450km (280 miles) to the southwest of the city. Nangka’s track was the furthest away from Hong Kong in 60 years of record-keeping to trigger the city’s third-highest storm alert. The signal led to closures of schools, restaurants and shopping malls, and suspension of public transport around the city. The typhoon signal was expected to be downgraded to a No 3 by the evening, as Nangka approached Hainan Island.

Nangka sets record for farthest cyclone to trigger a No 8 signal in Hong Kong it skirts by city
Silent Double Tenth Day in Hong Kong under national security law

Falling on October 10, Double Tenth Day commemorates the 1911 Wuchang uprising which ended Qing dynasty rule and led to the establishment of the Republic of China. But the day is only marked outside the Chinese mainland, and mostly by supporters of the Kuomintang or nationalists who lost China’s civil war to Communist forces in 1949. Double Tenth observances have been held for decades in Taiwan, Hong Kong and other places overseas where Kuomintang supporters fled. Since Hong Kong’s handover from British colonial rule in 1997, a few small groups of Kuomintang supporters had continued to raise flags and sing the national anthem of the Republic of China to mark the day. But in 2020, no such ceremonies took place, with organisers saying the events were cancelled amid fear of repercussions under the national security law that Beijing imposed on Hong Kong earlier in the year.

10 Oct 2020 - 6:11PM

Falling on October 10, Double Tenth Day commemorates the 1911 Wuchang uprising which ended Qing dynasty rule and led to the establishment of the Republic of China. But the day is only marked outside the Chinese mainland, and mostly by supporters of the Kuomintang or nationalists who lost China’s civil war to Communist forces in 1949. Double Tenth observances have been held for decades in Taiwan, Hong Kong and other places overseas where Kuomintang supporters fled. Since Hong Kong’s handover from British colonial rule in 1997, a few small groups of Kuomintang supporters had continued to raise flags and sing the national anthem of the Republic of China to mark the day. But in 2020, no such ceremonies took place, with organisers saying the events were cancelled amid fear of repercussions under the national security law that Beijing imposed on Hong Kong earlier in the year.

Silent Double Tenth Day in Hong Kong under national security law
Massive police presence blunts Hong Kong protests on China’s National Day

At least 74 people were arrested for taking part in an unauthorised assembly on National Day in Hong Kong on October 1, 2020, as riot police patrolled the city, and stopped and searched passers-by. Hong Kong had been bracing for potential chaos during events marking the 71st anniversary of the founding of the People’s Republic of China. But after authorities deployed some 6,000 officers, there were more police than protesters on the streets. This year's National Day was the first in Hong Kong since Beijing imposed a national security law on the city, which activists say severely limits freedom of expression.
 

2 Oct 2020 - 12:57AM

At least 74 people were arrested for taking part in an unauthorised assembly on National Day in Hong Kong on October 1, 2020, as riot police patrolled the city, and stopped and searched passers-by. Hong Kong had been bracing for potential chaos during events marking the 71st anniversary of the founding of the People’s Republic of China. But after authorities deployed some 6,000 officers, there were more police than protesters on the streets. This year's National Day was the first in Hong Kong since Beijing imposed a national security law on the city, which activists say severely limits freedom of expression.
 

Massive police presence blunts Hong Kong protests on China’s National Day
Worldwide Covid-19 death toll surpasses 1 million

The worldwide death toll from the Covid-19 pandemic surpassed one million on September 29, 2020. Countries that had previously seen a consistent drop in case numbers have started to report record highs, prompting governments to reintroduce social-distancing measures. The United States has the world’s largest number of infections, followed by India, which is trying to restart its battered economy despite a daily rise in its case numbers.
 

29 Sep 2020 - 10:43AM

The worldwide death toll from the Covid-19 pandemic surpassed one million on September 29, 2020. Countries that had previously seen a consistent drop in case numbers have started to report record highs, prompting governments to reintroduce social-distancing measures. The United States has the world’s largest number of infections, followed by India, which is trying to restart its battered economy despite a daily rise in its case numbers.
 

Worldwide Covid-19 death toll surpasses 1 million
Covid-19 pandemic forces Hong Kong hotels to rethink hospitality business models

Visitor arrivals in Hong Kong have plunged 99 per cent, according to official year-on-year figures, since the second quarter of 2020, as the city closed its borders to fight the spread of Covid-19. By July, the hotel occupancy rate in the city had sunk to 49 per cent, from 86 per cent in the same month the previous year. To survive the pandemic, operations from budget guest houses to luxury hotels started switching their focus to the local market. Rooms have been converted into long-term leases or to host staycation packages targeting customers in Hong Kong. As the business model changes, online booking platforms are reaping the benefits from soaring local demand.

22 Sep 2020 - 8:00AM

Visitor arrivals in Hong Kong have plunged 99 per cent, according to official year-on-year figures, since the second quarter of 2020, as the city closed its borders to fight the spread of Covid-19. By July, the hotel occupancy rate in the city had sunk to 49 per cent, from 86 per cent in the same month the previous year. To survive the pandemic, operations from budget guest houses to luxury hotels started switching their focus to the local market. Rooms have been converted into long-term leases or to host staycation packages targeting customers in Hong Kong. As the business model changes, online booking platforms are reaping the benefits from soaring local demand.

Covid-19 pandemic forces Hong Kong hotels to rethink hospitality business models
Online course on egg tart baking is recipe for pandemic survival for Hong Kong food tour operator

Virginia Chan is a Canadian-born Hong Kong foodie who runs a local food tour business. But when she was forced to suspend operations because of the Covid-19 pandemic, she had to find a new way to stay in business. Her recipe for survival was to take her passion for Hong Kong food into the digital space, with an online baking course to teach people how to make egg tarts, a classic local favourite.

8 Sep 2020 - 8:13PM

Virginia Chan is a Canadian-born Hong Kong foodie who runs a local food tour business. But when she was forced to suspend operations because of the Covid-19 pandemic, she had to find a new way to stay in business. Her recipe for survival was to take her passion for Hong Kong food into the digital space, with an online baking course to teach people how to make egg tarts, a classic local favourite.

Online course on egg tart baking is recipe for pandemic survival for Hong Kong food tour operator
Hong Kong launches universal Covid-19 tests for residents

Hong Kong residents began the en masse testing process for the coronavirus as the city’s government launched its universal screening programme on September 1, 2020, despite calls from activists and some health workers for a boycott. There are 141 sample collecting centres across all 18 districts and the programme will last at least one week.

1 Sep 2020 - 3:20PM

Hong Kong residents began the en masse testing process for the coronavirus as the city’s government launched its universal screening programme on September 1, 2020, despite calls from activists and some health workers for a boycott. There are 141 sample collecting centres across all 18 districts and the programme will last at least one week.

Hong Kong launches universal Covid-19 tests for residents
Explained: the history of China’s territorial disputes

China shares over 22,000 kilometres (13,670 miles) of border with 14 countries, but Beijing has disputes with many of its neighbours over where some of these international lines are drawn. The various territorial claims, citing history, politics and geography, have resulted in clashes and occasionally, outright military confrontations. Land borders aside, China also says its territory includes nearly all of the South China Sea, despite competing claims to parts of those waters made by many Southeast Asian countries. As tensions rise between China and the United States, Beijing has adopted a more aggressive attitude, pledging to defend China's “sovereignty and territorial integrity.”

29 Aug 2020 - 9:00PM

China shares over 22,000 kilometres (13,670 miles) of border with 14 countries, but Beijing has disputes with many of its neighbours over where some of these international lines are drawn. The various territorial claims, citing history, politics and geography, have resulted in clashes and occasionally, outright military confrontations. Land borders aside, China also says its territory includes nearly all of the South China Sea, despite competing claims to parts of those waters made by many Southeast Asian countries. As tensions rise between China and the United States, Beijing has adopted a more aggressive attitude, pledging to defend China's “sovereignty and territorial integrity.”

Explained: the history of China’s territorial disputes
Independent bookstores struggle under national security law in Hong Kong

Political books about Hong Kong’s democratic movement, gossip about Chinese leaders and rumours about politics on the Chinese mainland were once readily available at news stands and convenience stores across the city. But Beijing imposed a national security law for Hong Kong in July 2020, many books considered to be "sensitive" have disappeared from the shelves. The change is a worry for many in Hong Kong, including an independent bookstore owner who fears the new law could eventually have a serious impact on his business.

29 Aug 2020 - 8:00PM

Political books about Hong Kong’s democratic movement, gossip about Chinese leaders and rumours about politics on the Chinese mainland were once readily available at news stands and convenience stores across the city. But Beijing imposed a national security law for Hong Kong in July 2020, many books considered to be "sensitive" have disappeared from the shelves. The change is a worry for many in Hong Kong, including an independent bookstore owner who fears the new law could eventually have a serious impact on his business.

Independent bookstores struggle under national security law in Hong Kong
What started Hong Kong's third Covid-19 wave?

For months, Hong Kong was seen as an example of how a community could successfully contain Covid-19. The city was quick to isolate and trace infections and implemented measures to keep the public safe, moves which kept the number of cases relatively low. But after three weeks of zero local infections, Covid-19 cases in the city started to soar and Hong Kong entered its "third wave." So what happened to change things so suddenly?

31 Jul 2020 - 9:22AM

For months, Hong Kong was seen as an example of how a community could successfully contain Covid-19. The city was quick to isolate and trace infections and implemented measures to keep the public safe, moves which kept the number of cases relatively low. But after three weeks of zero local infections, Covid-19 cases in the city started to soar and Hong Kong entered its "third wave." So what happened to change things so suddenly?

What started Hong Kong's third Covid-19 wave?
Sign of the times: group tries to save Hong Kong’s last calligraphy signboards

For many years, calligraphy signboards for advertising and identifying businesses have been one of the most iconic elements of Hong Kong street scenes. But government regulations that were tightened in 2011 have led to a steady removal of the commercial markings. In an effort to save this aspect of the city’s historical and cultural heritage, architect Ken Fung Tat Wai partnered with Kevin Mak King-huai to establish Street Sign Hong Kong. The organisation works with shop owners to help them keep signboards on the streets. Another person trying to ensure the signs have a future is Au Yeung Cheong, a signboard calligrapher with over 30 years in the business who is now trying to find a way to hand along his skills to the next generation.

26 Jul 2020 - 10:00AM

For many years, calligraphy signboards for advertising and identifying businesses have been one of the most iconic elements of Hong Kong street scenes. But government regulations that were tightened in 2011 have led to a steady removal of the commercial markings. In an effort to save this aspect of the city’s historical and cultural heritage, architect Ken Fung Tat Wai partnered with Kevin Mak King-huai to establish Street Sign Hong Kong. The organisation works with shop owners to help them keep signboards on the streets. Another person trying to ensure the signs have a future is Au Yeung Cheong, a signboard calligrapher with over 30 years in the business who is now trying to find a way to hand along his skills to the next generation.

Sign of the times: group tries to save Hong Kong’s last calligraphy signboards
More than 610,000 vote in Hong Kong’s pro-democracy opposition primary elections

More than 610,000 people took part in a two-day primary election organised by Hong Kong’s opposition parties on July 11-12, 2020. The election saw traditional pan-democrats pitted against localist challengers to determine which candidates will get their names on tickets in Legislative Council elections scheduled for September 6. The vote comes less than two weeks after China’s central government enacted a controversial national security law for Hong Kong.

13 Jul 2020 - 6:46PM

More than 610,000 people took part in a two-day primary election organised by Hong Kong’s opposition parties on July 11-12, 2020. The election saw traditional pan-democrats pitted against localist challengers to determine which candidates will get their names on tickets in Legislative Council elections scheduled for September 6. The vote comes less than two weeks after China’s central government enacted a controversial national security law for Hong Kong.

More than 610,000 vote in Hong Kong’s pro-democracy opposition primary elections
Hong Kong erhu craftsman spent decade learning to made perfect traditional Chinese instruments

Tong Man-hak is a carpenter who learned the hard way how to make traditional Chinese two-stringed instruments known as erhu. The 76-year-old, who now lives in Hong Kong, was born in China’s southern Guangxi Zhuang autonomous region during the second Sino-Japanese war and in the 1980s moved to Hong Kong to reunite with his mother. 

10 Jul 2020 - 12:00PM

Tong Man-hak is a carpenter who learned the hard way how to make traditional Chinese two-stringed instruments known as erhu. The 76-year-old, who now lives in Hong Kong, was born in China’s southern Guangxi Zhuang autonomous region during the second Sino-Japanese war and in the 1980s moved to Hong Kong to reunite with his mother. 

Hong Kong erhu craftsman spent decade learning to made perfect traditional Chinese instruments
What you should know about China's new national security law for Hong Kong

China has imposed a sweeping national security law for Hong Kong that prohibits acts of secession, subversion, terrorism and collusion with a foreign power in the city. Details of the law were revealed as it went into effect late on June 30, 2020. The legislation has sparked widespread concern about its implications, despite assurances from officials who say it only targets a small minority in the city. The Post looks at how various parties could be affected under the law.
 

5 Jul 2020 - 7:27AM

China has imposed a sweeping national security law for Hong Kong that prohibits acts of secession, subversion, terrorism and collusion with a foreign power in the city. Details of the law were revealed as it went into effect late on June 30, 2020. The legislation has sparked widespread concern about its implications, despite assurances from officials who say it only targets a small minority in the city. The Post looks at how various parties could be affected under the law.
 

What you should know about China's new national security law for Hong Kong
Hong Kong police arrest 10 under new national security law

Hong Kong police say 10 people were arrested on July 1, 2020, under the city’s new national security law. It was the first time the police force exercised their new powers under the contentious legislation enacted the previous day by Chinese mainland authorities. The 10 were among about 370 people detained mainly for taking part in illegal assemblies, disorderly conduct and possession of offensive weapons. Despite the new risk of prosecution, thousands of anti-government protesters took to the streets to protest against the new law, openly defying a Covid-19 ban on the annual July 1 march. 
 

2 Jul 2020 - 12:45PM

Hong Kong police say 10 people were arrested on July 1, 2020, under the city’s new national security law. It was the first time the police force exercised their new powers under the contentious legislation enacted the previous day by Chinese mainland authorities. The 10 were among about 370 people detained mainly for taking part in illegal assemblies, disorderly conduct and possession of offensive weapons. Despite the new risk of prosecution, thousands of anti-government protesters took to the streets to protest against the new law, openly defying a Covid-19 ban on the annual July 1 march. 
 

Hong Kong police arrest 10 under new national security law
Hundreds arrested, thousands protest in Hong Kong during first day under new national security law

Thousands of people gathered in Hong Kong on July 1, 2020, expressing anger over Beijing's national security law for the city, as it marked 23 years since its handover from British to Chinese rule. Police had banned the annual protest march organised by pro-democracy activists, citing concerns over Covid-19 and violence in previous demonstrations. Despite the ban, thousands protested and engaged in a game of cat and mouse with police in Hong Kong's busy Wan Chai district. 
 

1 Jul 2020 - 11:36PM

Thousands of people gathered in Hong Kong on July 1, 2020, expressing anger over Beijing's national security law for the city, as it marked 23 years since its handover from British to Chinese rule. Police had banned the annual protest march organised by pro-democracy activists, citing concerns over Covid-19 and violence in previous demonstrations. Despite the ban, thousands protested and engaged in a game of cat and mouse with police in Hong Kong's busy Wan Chai district. 
 

Hundreds arrested, thousands protest in Hong Kong during first day under new national security law
Beijing passes national security law for Hong Kong

Beijing’s top legislative body on June 30, 2020, unanimously passed a law for Hong Kong prohibiting acts of secession, subversion, terrorism and collusion with foreign forces to endanger national security. Chinese officials said the law was necessary to stop anti-government protests that broke out in the city in June 2019. 

30 Jun 2020 - 9:21PM

Beijing’s top legislative body on June 30, 2020, unanimously passed a law for Hong Kong prohibiting acts of secession, subversion, terrorism and collusion with foreign forces to endanger national security. Chinese officials said the law was necessary to stop anti-government protests that broke out in the city in June 2019. 

Beijing passes national security law for Hong Kong
Thousands of Hongkongers defy ban and gather to mark Tiananmen anniversary

Hong Kong marked the 31st anniversary of the Tiananmen Square crackdown amid a police ban against the annual Victoria Park vigil because of Covid-19 social distancing restrictions. Thousands defied the ban and gathered in the park anyway, knocking down steel barriers and entering the football pitches. Elsewhere in the city, people gathered to light candles and held a moment of silence to commemorate those who died in the crackdown on June 4, 1989. The vigils were largely peaceful, but scuffles broke out in Mong Kok district in Kowloon shortly after 9pm.

5 Jun 2020 - 2:27AM

Hong Kong marked the 31st anniversary of the Tiananmen Square crackdown amid a police ban against the annual Victoria Park vigil because of Covid-19 social distancing restrictions. Thousands defied the ban and gathered in the park anyway, knocking down steel barriers and entering the football pitches. Elsewhere in the city, people gathered to light candles and held a moment of silence to commemorate those who died in the crackdown on June 4, 1989. The vigils were largely peaceful, but scuffles broke out in Mong Kok district in Kowloon shortly after 9pm.

Thousands of Hongkongers defy ban and gather to mark Tiananmen anniversary
Tear gas fired as thousands protest Beijing’s planned national security law for Hong Kong

Hong Kong police fired multiple rounds of tear gas and used a water cannon in the Causeway Bay shopping district on Sunday as thousands took to the streets in protest. Angered by Beijing’s planned national security law for the city, protesters denounced the proposed legislation as a threat to civil liberties and the end of the “one country, two systems” principle.

24 May 2020 - 10:50PM

Hong Kong police fired multiple rounds of tear gas and used a water cannon in the Causeway Bay shopping district on Sunday as thousands took to the streets in protest. Angered by Beijing’s planned national security law for the city, protesters denounced the proposed legislation as a threat to civil liberties and the end of the “one country, two systems” principle.

Tear gas fired as thousands protest Beijing’s planned national security law for Hong Kong
The ‘two sessions’ explained: China’s most important political meetings of the year

China normally holds its most important annual political meetings in March, when the top political advisory body and national legislature gather. But in 2020, the meetings were postponed to May 22, 2020, because of the coronavirus pandemic.
Although the “two sessions” take place only days apart on the political calendar, the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Congress (CPPCC) and the National People’s Congress (NPC) are two very distinct gatherings.
Here’s a closer look at how the two sessions, known as lianghui in Chinese, shape the nation’s policies.
 

20 May 2020 - 2:21PM

China normally holds its most important annual political meetings in March, when the top political advisory body and national legislature gather. But in 2020, the meetings were postponed to May 22, 2020, because of the coronavirus pandemic.
Although the “two sessions” take place only days apart on the political calendar, the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Congress (CPPCC) and the National People’s Congress (NPC) are two very distinct gatherings.
Here’s a closer look at how the two sessions, known as lianghui in Chinese, shape the nation’s policies.
 

The ‘two sessions’ explained: China’s most important political meetings of the year
After 32 years, Chinese mother is finally reunited with her kidnapped son

A Chinese mother, Li Jingzhi, spent decades looking for her missing son, who was believed to have been kidnapped in 1988. After so many desperate years, she was finally reunited with her boy on May 18, 2020. 

20 May 2020 - 10:24AM

A Chinese mother, Li Jingzhi, spent decades looking for her missing son, who was believed to have been kidnapped in 1988. After so many desperate years, she was finally reunited with her boy on May 18, 2020. 

After 32 years, Chinese mother is finally reunited with her kidnapped son
Hong Kong’s ‘abalone king’ Yeung Koon-yat recalls his path to success

Yeung Koon-yat came to Hong Kong in 1949 and worked his way up from washing dishes to eventually opening his Forum Restaurant in 1977, where he soon earned a reputation as the city’s “abalone king”.
He says the secret of his signature abalone is the soup, which must be simmered with chicken, pork bones and lean pork in charcoal stoves.
In his more than four decades as restaurateur, Yeung has earned two Michelin stars and widespread praise for his signature "Ah Yat braised abalone".

15 May 2020 - 12:00PM

Yeung Koon-yat came to Hong Kong in 1949 and worked his way up from washing dishes to eventually opening his Forum Restaurant in 1977, where he soon earned a reputation as the city’s “abalone king”.
He says the secret of his signature abalone is the soup, which must be simmered with chicken, pork bones and lean pork in charcoal stoves.
In his more than four decades as restaurateur, Yeung has earned two Michelin stars and widespread praise for his signature "Ah Yat braised abalone".

Hong Kong’s ‘abalone king’ Yeung Koon-yat recalls his path to success
Protesters gather in shopping malls across Hong Kong to chant slogans, stage singalongs

Hundreds of protesters gathered in at least 10 shopping malls across Hong Kong on May 10, 2020 to chant slogans and sing the anthem of the anti-government movement, Glory to Hong Kong. 

12 May 2020 - 9:41PM

Hundreds of protesters gathered in at least 10 shopping malls across Hong Kong on May 10, 2020 to chant slogans and sing the anthem of the anti-government movement, Glory to Hong Kong. 

Protesters gather in shopping malls across Hong Kong to chant slogans, stage singalongs
‘Without health, you are nobody’, top Chinese tenor Warren Mok learns from his battle with Covid-19

Warren Mok Wah-yeun, known as one of “China’s Three Tenors”, tested positive for Covid-19 while entering Thailand for a holiday following a business trip to the United States. The Hong Kong based musician spent 26 days in hospital in the Thai capital Bangkok before finally testing negative for the disease and being allowed to fly home. But after he arrived in Hong Kong, Mok tested positive again and had to spend two more weeks in hospital before being declared fully recovered and discharged.

10 May 2020 - 9:00AM

Warren Mok Wah-yeun, known as one of “China’s Three Tenors”, tested positive for Covid-19 while entering Thailand for a holiday following a business trip to the United States. The Hong Kong based musician spent 26 days in hospital in the Thai capital Bangkok before finally testing negative for the disease and being allowed to fly home. But after he arrived in Hong Kong, Mok tested positive again and had to spend two more weeks in hospital before being declared fully recovered and discharged.

‘Without health, you are nobody’, top Chinese tenor Warren Mok learns from his battle with Covid-19
Beloved 50-year-old beef noodle shop latest victim of coronavirus and high rent in Hong Kong

Hop Hing Noodle Ka, a family-run noodle shop in Hong Kong, closed on April 26, 2020, after almost 50 years of serving delicious beef offal, beef brisket and cuttlefish balls. In the last few days of operation, foodies waited in long queues just to taste the restaurant's signature dishes one last time.

29 Apr 2020 - 9:31PM

Hop Hing Noodle Ka, a family-run noodle shop in Hong Kong, closed on April 26, 2020, after almost 50 years of serving delicious beef offal, beef brisket and cuttlefish balls. In the last few days of operation, foodies waited in long queues just to taste the restaurant's signature dishes one last time.

Beloved 50-year-old beef noodle shop latest victim of coronavirus and high rent in Hong Kong
Photographer tries to preserve China’s Great Wall heritage with focus on crumbling sections

China’s Great Wall was first built in the 3rd century BC and for hundreds of years has been built up by successive leaders to defend against threats from nomadic tribes. But natural erosion the footsteps of millions of visitors have taken a toll on the globally recognised historical site which is crumbling in many areas.

19 Apr 2020 - 3:07PM

China’s Great Wall was first built in the 3rd century BC and for hundreds of years has been built up by successive leaders to defend against threats from nomadic tribes. But natural erosion the footsteps of millions of visitors have taken a toll on the globally recognised historical site which is crumbling in many areas.

Photographer tries to preserve China’s Great Wall heritage with focus on crumbling sections
Tracking the massive impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on the world’s airline industry in early 2020

The novel coronavirus that causes Covid-19 was first detected in Wuhan, China in late 2019,  and took only a few months to spread into a global pandemic. Health experts say modern advanced transport including air travel has greatly increased the pace of the pandemic. Though governments around the world imposed lockdowns, isolations and quarantines for travellers, such measures also had a devastating impact on the global economy and many industries including aviation. Airline tracking site Flight Radar 24 documented a massive reduction in the number of aircraft flying around the world, and the International Air Transport Association predicts that air traffic in 2020 may fall by at least 38 per cent. What do the numbers tell us about the future for global aviation? 

16 Apr 2020 - 3:27PM

The novel coronavirus that causes Covid-19 was first detected in Wuhan, China in late 2019,  and took only a few months to spread into a global pandemic. Health experts say modern advanced transport including air travel has greatly increased the pace of the pandemic. Though governments around the world imposed lockdowns, isolations and quarantines for travellers, such measures also had a devastating impact on the global economy and many industries including aviation. Airline tracking site Flight Radar 24 documented a massive reduction in the number of aircraft flying around the world, and the International Air Transport Association predicts that air traffic in 2020 may fall by at least 38 per cent. What do the numbers tell us about the future for global aviation? 

Tracking the massive impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on the world’s airline industry in early 2020
Hong Kong can withstand fiscal woes amid Covid-19 pandemic, says city's financial secretary

Hong Kong’s government has unveiled its most expensive coronavirus financial relief package so far, earmarking HK$137.5 billion (US$18 billion) to save failing businesses in the city. The financial secretary of Hong Kong Paul Chan Mo-po told the South China Morning Post in an interview on April 15, 2020 that he is “very confident to withstand any financial attack” even if the government is digging deep into its fiscal reserves amid the coronavirus pandemic.

16 Apr 2020 - 11:31AM

Hong Kong’s government has unveiled its most expensive coronavirus financial relief package so far, earmarking HK$137.5 billion (US$18 billion) to save failing businesses in the city. The financial secretary of Hong Kong Paul Chan Mo-po told the South China Morning Post in an interview on April 15, 2020 that he is “very confident to withstand any financial attack” even if the government is digging deep into its fiscal reserves amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Hong Kong can withstand fiscal woes amid Covid-19 pandemic, says city's financial secretary