Su-Lin Tan
Su-Lin Tan
Hong Kong
@SuLin_Tan
Correspondent, Asia
Su-Lin Tan joined the Post in 2020 after the Australian Financial Review where she covered housing and commercial property, Asian business and street talk and investigations. She is a qualified accountant and worked in investment banking and funds management both in London and Sydney before becoming a journalist.

In this issue of Global Impact, we look at what an Albanese administration might mean for relations with China that deteriorated dramatically under Scott Morrison’s watch.

The Labor Party, led by career politician Anthony Albanese, is on track to beat the coalition although its ability to form a majority government remains uncertain.

The incumbent prime minister thinks nothing of issuing threats to sovereign nations, as he did after the Solomon Islands signed a security pact with China. Yet he refuses to explain how his ‘red line’ would be crossed.

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A Liberal MP who mixed up two Asian candidates, then refused to apologise, has been ridiculed on social media as the ruling coalition trails in the polls.

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While both the ruling Liberal coalition and opposition Labor parties are talking tough on Beijing, analysts say the latter may adopt a ‘less provocative’ brand of diplomacy.

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Opinion polls suggest Anthony Albanese’s Labor party is ahead of incumbent PM Scott Morrison’s ruling conservative coalition, but surveys have not been a good predictor of election outcomes.

Asian-Australian candidates running for election in a country with less political diversity than Canada, Britain or New Zealand discuss the xenophobia they face and the issues that matter

The Labor Party has accused the government of inconsistency over the island chain’s security pact with China, with its talk of both ‘red lines’ and respect for sovereignty ahead of the May 21 election.

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Australians head to the polls very soon, yet they’ve still not heard proper debates or long-term solutions to the many issues their country faces. How can it be more productive, without China, as relations deteriorate, and what about climate change and racism?

Long before campaigning began for May’s federal election, Canberra talked of national security threats from Beijing, like cyberattacks or even war; racism has also reared its head.

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Liberal Party senator Andrew Bragg was referring to the ruling coalition’s ‘intemperate rhetoric’ about China; observers said that showed how ‘out of touch’ the coalition is about racism.

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Defence Minister Peter Dutton says China’s “interference” in the PM’s WeChat account and the actions of editors of Chinese newspapers in Australia are evidence Beijing is trying to influence the May 21 election.

Canberra has sought new free-trade deals after its largest trading partner China placed restrictions on some Australian exports in 2020 amid spiralling tensions.

As politicians focus on ‘invisible enemies’ and obsess with pursuing ‘national security’ preserving peace overseas, a battle against discrimination and racism will tear through civil Australian society.

Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison was responding to accusations by opposition leader Anthony Albanese that his government’s foreign policy failures resulted in the pact between China and the Solomon Islands.

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Canberra needs to show genuine interest in Asia-Pacific in 2022, a milestone year that marks a half-century since the establishment of China-Australia relations.

Analysts say the incident has exposed Canberra’s inadequate diplomacy with its Pacific island neighbours as it scrambles to show it’s in control of regional security.

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Prime Minister Scott Morrison has called for the election on May 21 against a backdrop of missteps and controversies; China is portrayed as a threat to Australia, with allegations of foreign interference and spying.

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Australia is still popular with Chinese investors despite tricky ties but government figures show yearly approvals of new US investments have surged. Investors from Singapore have been piling funds into the real estate sector.

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His comments come as Aukus leaders have expanded the pact to include the building of hypersonic missiles in addition to providing Canberra with nuclear-powered subs.

Analysts say the muted response to New Delhi buying discounted Russian oil amid the Ukraine war reflects a desire to preserve India’s position in the Indo-Pacific security framework – and prevent Moscow getting closer to Beijing.

Processing Beijing’s application would require existing members of the trade bloc to ‘sit down and talk and work through the issues’, Australian trade minister Dan Tehan said.

Most countries will face headwinds in two ways: higher commodity prices and therefore sustained inflation, and slower demand for manufactured goods from troubled economies like Europe.

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Scott Morrison says Australia would move in lockstep with its allies to sanction China if it has provided military support to Russia in its war with Ukraine.

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There’s a danger Russia could call time on talks for the services aspect of a bilateral free-trade agreement, after its envoy berated the city-state for its unilateral sanctions over the Ukraine invasion.

Russia’s two-way trade with Asia (including China) has grown in the last decade. As economic sanctions for invading Ukraine mount, some analysts believe Asian trade networks can be a fallback plan for Putin.

Asian buyers and sellers are scrambling for corn and wheat as supplies have been cut off from the Black Sea as a result of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.

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