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Sue Ng
Sue Ng
Sue joined the Post in 2021. She graduated from the University of Hong Kong with a double major in journalism and counselling.

Ranny Yau Chun-yin, principal of TWGHs Kap Yan Directors’ College, also questioned implementation for cross-border families and emphasised need for privacy.

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Small actions, like reducing electricity use and taking public transport, can cut greenhouse gas emissions and help the environment, one student writes

The president of the Royal Spanish Football Federation kissed Spanish player Jenni Hermoso without her consent following the win, leading to demonstrations.

Proposed bill would address rise in child abuse cases, but one worker at the Hong Kong Family Welfare Society says it’s not the only way to protect vulnerable kids.

Friends are one of life’s greatest treasures, so use these phrases to show your appreciation for people who have stuck with you through thick and thin.

Experts say releasing the contaminated water into the Pacific Ocean is safe, as it goes through an intensive dilution process, but some radioactive elements remain.

Olympic medallist Siobhan Haughey presented the award for sportsperson of the year, saying it was ‘inspiring’ to see the new generation of winners.

Peony Sham, 17, scores top prize for volunteering and spearheading mental health initiative at annual event organised by Post and sponsored by Jockey Club.

Allison Hong Merrill shares the story of Wu Tien-fu, a Chinese girl trafficked to America in the 1800s before she was rescued and dedicated her life to helping others like her.

Organisation supports students in their overseas studies by administering IELTS exams, offering briefings on life in UK, and organising university roadshows.

Hong Kong Family Welfare Society has been holding events to educate the public about family well-being, from workshops for educators to street booths for parents.

About 50,800 pupils have finished exams for four core subjects on Hong Kong’s university entrance exams, with tough English reading paper sparking controversy.

Their workshops teach people how to compose funeral songs, craft urns and write farewell letters, while also exploring how these are connected to the meaning of life.