Zhiwu Chen

Professor Zhiwu Chen is director of the Asia Global Institute and Victor and William Fung Professor in Economics at the University of Hong Kong. He is a former professor of finance at Yale University (1999-2017). His research covers finance theory, the sociology of finance, economic history, emerging markets, as well as China's economy and capital markets. He was also a special-term visiting professor at Peking University (School of Economics) and Tsinghua University (School of Social Sciences).
Zhiwu Chen
Professor Zhiwu Chen is director of the Asia Global Institute and Victor and William Fung Professor in Economics at the University of Hong Kong. He is a former professor of finance at Yale University (1999-2017). His research covers finance theory, the sociology of finance, economic history, emerging markets, as well as China's economy and capital markets. He was also a special-term visiting professor at Peking University (School of Economics) and Tsinghua University (School of Social Sciences).

Latest from Zhiwu Chen

Opinion | Donald Trump won round one of the trade war. In round two, China has the upper hand

The US may have succeeded in forcing a relocation of supply chains from China, but now that the damage has been done, the Chinese are in no hurry to clinch a deal. Not so for Trump, who has an election to win amid signs of a slowing US economy.

20 Sep 2019 - 5:20AM

The US may have succeeded in forcing a relocation of supply chains from China, but now that the damage has been done, the Chinese are in no hurry to clinch a deal. Not so for Trump, who has an election to win amid signs of a slowing US economy.

Donald Trump won round one of the trade war. In round two, China has the upper hand
After Bo Xilai, corruption as usual

One cannot open a Chinese newspaper these days without seeing a story about corrupt officials being hauled up. Is it, then, the beginning of the cleansing process promised by President Xi Jinping ? It sure is. China's new leadership is speeding up efforts to crack down on corruption, the most prominent example being the recent life sentence for Bo Xilai. But chances are that corruption will continue unless China first undertakes key reforms to reduce private benefits from corruption and increase the perceived costs.

29 Sep 2013 - 1:22AM

One cannot open a Chinese newspaper these days without seeing a story about corrupt officials being hauled up. Is it, then, the beginning of the cleansing process promised by President Xi Jinping ? It sure is. China's new leadership is speeding up efforts to crack down on corruption, the most prominent example being the recent life sentence for Bo Xilai. But chances are that corruption will continue unless China first undertakes key reforms to reduce private benefits from corruption and increase the perceived costs.

After Bo Xilai, corruption as usual