‘A record-shattering US$450 million paid last week for Leonardo da Vinci’s Salvator Mundi is surely a reflection of how years of global money printing has fuelled asset-price inflation.’ Photo: AFP ‘A record-shattering US$450 million paid last week for Leonardo da Vinci’s Salvator Mundi is surely a reflection of how years of global money printing has fuelled asset-price inflation.’ Photo: AFP
‘A record-shattering US$450 million paid last week for Leonardo da Vinci’s Salvator Mundi is surely a reflection of how years of global money printing has fuelled asset-price inflation.’ Photo: AFP
Neal Kimberley
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Neal Kimberley

How are asset prices so high amid spiralling US debt, Fed recession warnings?

Or how Fed rate rises and an eye-popping price for an Old Master can coexist with a flattening US yield curve

‘A record-shattering US$450 million paid last week for Leonardo da Vinci’s Salvator Mundi is surely a reflection of how years of global money printing has fuelled asset-price inflation.’ Photo: AFP ‘A record-shattering US$450 million paid last week for Leonardo da Vinci’s Salvator Mundi is surely a reflection of how years of global money printing has fuelled asset-price inflation.’ Photo: AFP
‘A record-shattering US$450 million paid last week for Leonardo da Vinci’s Salvator Mundi is surely a reflection of how years of global money printing has fuelled asset-price inflation.’ Photo: AFP
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Neal Kimberley

Neal Kimberley

UK-based Neal Kimberley has been active in the financial markets since 1985. Having worked in sales and trading in the dealing rooms of major banks in London for many years, he moved to ThomsonReuters in 2009 to provide market analysis. He has been contributing to the Post since 2015 and writes about macroeconomics from a market perspective, with a particular emphasis on currencies and interest rates.