A poster advertising the launch of Hong Kong iBonds at a Bank of China branch in Central on July 23, 2014, the first day of public subscription. The latest round of iBonds will include some with yields of 2 per cent, an enticement to investors at a time when many central banks are considering interest rates near or even below zero. Photo: K.Y. Cheng A poster advertising the launch of Hong Kong iBonds at a Bank of China branch in Central on July 23, 2014, the first day of public subscription. The latest round of iBonds will include some with yields of 2 per cent, an enticement to investors at a time when many central banks are considering interest rates near or even below zero. Photo: K.Y. Cheng
A poster advertising the launch of Hong Kong iBonds at a Bank of China branch in Central on July 23, 2014, the first day of public subscription. The latest round of iBonds will include some with yields of 2 per cent, an enticement to investors at a time when many central banks are considering interest rates near or even below zero. Photo: K.Y. Cheng
Tai Hui
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Tai Hui

Why Hong Kong iBonds, China government bonds offer a haven to investors seeking yields

  • US and European government bonds used to be an insurance policy but now investors are paying a higher price for protection that might not be as effective
  • Hong Kong’s inflation-linked bonds offer an alternative, while Chinese bonds are increasingly drawing international investors’ attention

A poster advertising the launch of Hong Kong iBonds at a Bank of China branch in Central on July 23, 2014, the first day of public subscription. The latest round of iBonds will include some with yields of 2 per cent, an enticement to investors at a time when many central banks are considering interest rates near or even below zero. Photo: K.Y. Cheng A poster advertising the launch of Hong Kong iBonds at a Bank of China branch in Central on July 23, 2014, the first day of public subscription. The latest round of iBonds will include some with yields of 2 per cent, an enticement to investors at a time when many central banks are considering interest rates near or even below zero. Photo: K.Y. Cheng
A poster advertising the launch of Hong Kong iBonds at a Bank of China branch in Central on July 23, 2014, the first day of public subscription. The latest round of iBonds will include some with yields of 2 per cent, an enticement to investors at a time when many central banks are considering interest rates near or even below zero. Photo: K.Y. Cheng
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