School students use portable fans amid the sweltering heat in Seoul, South Korea, on August 1, 2018. As the trade war escalates, the Korean won could be the next Asian currency to feel the pressure. Photo: AP School students use portable fans amid the sweltering heat in Seoul, South Korea, on August 1, 2018. As the trade war escalates, the Korean won could be the next Asian currency to feel the pressure. Photo: AP
School students use portable fans amid the sweltering heat in Seoul, South Korea, on August 1, 2018. As the trade war escalates, the Korean won could be the next Asian currency to feel the pressure. Photo: AP
Neal Kimberley
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Neal Kimberley

Why the US-China trade war could turn the heat on the Korean won and Australian dollar next

Neal Kimberley says an intensification of the US-China trade war, combined with Federal Reserve monetary tightening, could be double trouble for currencies in the Asian region

School students use portable fans amid the sweltering heat in Seoul, South Korea, on August 1, 2018. As the trade war escalates, the Korean won could be the next Asian currency to feel the pressure. Photo: AP School students use portable fans amid the sweltering heat in Seoul, South Korea, on August 1, 2018. As the trade war escalates, the Korean won could be the next Asian currency to feel the pressure. Photo: AP
School students use portable fans amid the sweltering heat in Seoul, South Korea, on August 1, 2018. As the trade war escalates, the Korean won could be the next Asian currency to feel the pressure. Photo: AP
READ FULL ARTICLE
Neal Kimberley

Neal Kimberley

UK-based Neal Kimberley has been active in the financial markets since 1985. Having worked in sales and trading in the dealing rooms of major banks in London for many years, he moved to ThomsonReuters in 2009 to provide market analysis. He has been contributing to the Post since 2015 and writes about macroeconomics from a market perspective, with a particular emphasis on currencies and interest rates.