Federal Reserve chairman Jerome Powell speaks at a press conference following a two-day Federal Open Market Committee policy meeting in Washington on January 30. After steadily raising interest rates in 2018, the Fed has signalled that it would be in no hurry to increase borrowing costs this year. Photo: Reuters
Nicholas Spiro
Opinion

Opinion

The View by Nicholas Spiro

As central banks turn dovish, how loose will this year’s monetary policy be?

  • Nicholas Spiro says the Federal Reserve’s more cautious stance towards raising interest rates has set the pace for other central banks. However, while the US economy may be showing signs of slowing, China and Europe are of greater concern

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Federal Reserve chairman Jerome Powell speaks at a press conference following a two-day Federal Open Market Committee policy meeting in Washington on January 30. After steadily raising interest rates in 2018, the Fed has signalled that it would be in no hurry to increase borrowing costs this year. Photo: Reuters
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People walk past the New York Stock Exchange. The quantitative easing bluff has been called and financial markets know now that they can force monetary authorities to extend or increase stimulus by throwing a taper tantrum. Photo: Getty Images/AFP
Anthony Rowley
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Anthony Rowley

The world’s mounting debt crisis must solved before it blows up in our face

  • The lack of an exit strategy from the monetary excess is catching up with the world
  • The QE largesse did not go into investment and consumption but it did prop up financial institutions that were swaying on the edge of the abyss

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People walk past the New York Stock Exchange. The quantitative easing bluff has been called and financial markets know now that they can force monetary authorities to extend or increase stimulus by throwing a taper tantrum. Photo: Getty Images/AFP
READ FULL ARTICLE