A line of police officers rides an escalator behind a protester wearing a placard which reads: “Hong Kong is ours, save it ourselves”, ahead of Chief Executive Carrie Lam’s annual policy address on October 16, as anti-government protests entered their fifth month. Photo: Reuters

When Hong Kong politicians don’t care about the city, voters need a ‘none of the above’ option to dismiss them all

  • When the pro-Beijing bloc is a rubber stamp and the pro-democracy groups give approval to mob violence, adding a ‘NOTA’ option could not only allow voters to express disapproval, but keep undesirable candidates off the ballot
Topic |   Hong Kong protests

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A line of police officers rides an escalator behind a protester wearing a placard which reads: “Hong Kong is ours, save it ourselves”, ahead of Chief Executive Carrie Lam’s annual policy address on October 16, as anti-government protests entered their fifth month. Photo: Reuters
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Joshua Wong announces his candidacy for November’s district council elections, in Tamar on September 28. Wong’s candidacy is likely to spur turnout in his poll, even if he is ultimately disqualified. Photo: K. Y. Cheng
Mike Rowse
Opinion

Opinion

Mike Rowse

Hong Kong’s protests have reshaped the city, and the November district council elections will show how much

  • Tolerance of violence and distrust of police are not normal for Hong Kong, yet that’s the city’s present situation. Barring sudden change – or cancellation – this suggests the next elections will see a stark shift towards the pan-dems

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Joshua Wong announces his candidacy for November’s district council elections, in Tamar on September 28. Wong’s candidacy is likely to spur turnout in his poll, even if he is ultimately disqualified. Photo: K. Y. Cheng
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