American civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jnr waves to supporters during the “March on Washington” on August 28, 1963. The march, calling for civil and economic rights for African Americans, was also the occasion of King’s iconic “I Have A Dream” speech. Photo: AFP American civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jnr waves to supporters during the “March on Washington” on August 28, 1963. The march, calling for civil and economic rights for African Americans, was also the occasion of King’s iconic “I Have A Dream” speech. Photo: AFP
American civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jnr waves to supporters during the “March on Washington” on August 28, 1963. The march, calling for civil and economic rights for African Americans, was also the occasion of King’s iconic “I Have A Dream” speech. Photo: AFP

Letters | How Hong Kong protesters can build on recent victories by learning from Martin Luther King

  • Vandalism and violence can only deprive the protest movement of sympathy, while non-violent resistance would do the opposite

Topic |   Hong Kong protests
American civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jnr waves to supporters during the “March on Washington” on August 28, 1963. The march, calling for civil and economic rights for African Americans, was also the occasion of King’s iconic “I Have A Dream” speech. Photo: AFP American civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jnr waves to supporters during the “March on Washington” on August 28, 1963. The march, calling for civil and economic rights for African Americans, was also the occasion of King’s iconic “I Have A Dream” speech. Photo: AFP
American civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jnr waves to supporters during the “March on Washington” on August 28, 1963. The march, calling for civil and economic rights for African Americans, was also the occasion of King’s iconic “I Have A Dream” speech. Photo: AFP
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