Hundreds queue in Sham Shui Po for free rice and surgical masks in February 2020, as Hong Kong grappled with shortages amid a coronavirus outbreak. The work of NGOs, charities and other social enterprises is more important than ever in a city in crisis, but many are facing bankruptcy. Photo: Nora TamHundreds queue in Sham Shui Po for free rice and surgical masks in February 2020, as Hong Kong grappled with shortages amid a coronavirus outbreak. The work of NGOs, charities and other social enterprises is more important than ever in a city in crisis, but many are facing bankruptcy. Photo: Nora Tam
Hundreds queue in Sham Shui Po for free rice and surgical masks in February 2020, as Hong Kong grappled with shortages amid a coronavirus outbreak. The work of NGOs, charities and other social enterprises is more important than ever in a city in crisis, but many are facing bankruptcy. Photo: Nora Tam

Letters | As Hong Kong battles new coronavirus, here’s how city can help charities keep up the good work

  • Wealthier Hongkongers could donate their HK$10,000 government handouts, while companies could relax the timing and conditions of grants and CSR programmes
Topic |   Coronavirus pandemic
Hundreds queue in Sham Shui Po for free rice and surgical masks in February 2020, as Hong Kong grappled with shortages amid a coronavirus outbreak. The work of NGOs, charities and other social enterprises is more important than ever in a city in crisis, but many are facing bankruptcy. Photo: Nora TamHundreds queue in Sham Shui Po for free rice and surgical masks in February 2020, as Hong Kong grappled with shortages amid a coronavirus outbreak. The work of NGOs, charities and other social enterprises is more important than ever in a city in crisis, but many are facing bankruptcy. Photo: Nora Tam
Hundreds queue in Sham Shui Po for free rice and surgical masks in February 2020, as Hong Kong grappled with shortages amid a coronavirus outbreak. The work of NGOs, charities and other social enterprises is more important than ever in a city in crisis, but many are facing bankruptcy. Photo: Nora Tam
READ FULL ARTICLE