The Chinese flag is displayed outside Beijing’s Office for Safeguarding National Security in Causeway Bay, Hong Kong, on July 9, in the wake of the adoption of a new national security law for the city. Even if the law’s bark is a lot worse than its bite, the thought of being arrested and tried in court could deter some from speaking their mind. Photo: EPA-EFE The Chinese flag is displayed outside Beijing’s Office for Safeguarding National Security in Causeway Bay, Hong Kong, on July 9, in the wake of the adoption of a new national security law for the city. Even if the law’s bark is a lot worse than its bite, the thought of being arrested and tried in court could deter some from speaking their mind. Photo: EPA-EFE
The Chinese flag is displayed outside Beijing’s Office for Safeguarding National Security in Causeway Bay, Hong Kong, on July 9, in the wake of the adoption of a new national security law for the city. Even if the law’s bark is a lot worse than its bite, the thought of being arrested and tried in court could deter some from speaking their mind. Photo: EPA-EFE

Letters | Hong Kong national security law’s chilling effect on freedom of speech is real

  • While the justice secretary has said that whether slogan-chanting is illegal will depend on the circumstances and be determined by the courts, many people are likely to think twice about speaking up, even if the criticism is constructive

Topic |   Hong Kong national security law (NSL)
The Chinese flag is displayed outside Beijing’s Office for Safeguarding National Security in Causeway Bay, Hong Kong, on July 9, in the wake of the adoption of a new national security law for the city. Even if the law’s bark is a lot worse than its bite, the thought of being arrested and tried in court could deter some from speaking their mind. Photo: EPA-EFE The Chinese flag is displayed outside Beijing’s Office for Safeguarding National Security in Causeway Bay, Hong Kong, on July 9, in the wake of the adoption of a new national security law for the city. Even if the law’s bark is a lot worse than its bite, the thought of being arrested and tried in court could deter some from speaking their mind. Photo: EPA-EFE
The Chinese flag is displayed outside Beijing’s Office for Safeguarding National Security in Causeway Bay, Hong Kong, on July 9, in the wake of the adoption of a new national security law for the city. Even if the law’s bark is a lot worse than its bite, the thought of being arrested and tried in court could deter some from speaking their mind. Photo: EPA-EFE
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