Over 200 people march from Causeway Bay to Carrie Lam’s office on April 23, 2017, to protest against her “small-circle” election as chief executive by a 1,200-member Election Committee. Photo: Sam Tsang Over 200 people march from Causeway Bay to Carrie Lam’s office on April 23, 2017, to protest against her “small-circle” election as chief executive by a 1,200-member Election Committee. Photo: Sam Tsang
Over 200 people march from Causeway Bay to Carrie Lam’s office on April 23, 2017, to protest against her “small-circle” election as chief executive by a 1,200-member Election Committee. Photo: Sam Tsang

Letters | Hong Kong has a national security law, universal suffrage should be next

  • The enactment of the national security law should convince Beijing that the conditions are ideal for launching the political reform process

Topic |   Hong Kong politics
Over 200 people march from Causeway Bay to Carrie Lam’s office on April 23, 2017, to protest against her “small-circle” election as chief executive by a 1,200-member Election Committee. Photo: Sam Tsang Over 200 people march from Causeway Bay to Carrie Lam’s office on April 23, 2017, to protest against her “small-circle” election as chief executive by a 1,200-member Election Committee. Photo: Sam Tsang
Over 200 people march from Causeway Bay to Carrie Lam’s office on April 23, 2017, to protest against her “small-circle” election as chief executive by a 1,200-member Election Committee. Photo: Sam Tsang
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