A statue of the “Goddess of Democracy” stands in Hong Kong’s Victoria Park on June 4 last year, before the annual candlelight vigil commemorating the crackdown on pro-democracy protests in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square. Photo: EPA-EFE A statue of the “Goddess of Democracy” stands in Hong Kong’s Victoria Park on June 4 last year, before the annual candlelight vigil commemorating the crackdown on pro-democracy protests in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square. Photo: EPA-EFE
A statue of the “Goddess of Democracy” stands in Hong Kong’s Victoria Park on June 4 last year, before the annual candlelight vigil commemorating the crackdown on pro-democracy protests in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square. Photo: EPA-EFE

Letters | Hong Kong’s national security law has killed democracy dream

  • The closer surveillance of schools and strict curbs on freedom of speech have chilling implications for any hopes for the democratisation of Hong Kong’s – and China’s – political system
  • Only through universal suffrage can government gain legitimacy, and rule with the consent of the people. But will calls for democratisation now be seen as subversion?

Topic |   Hong Kong protests
A statue of the “Goddess of Democracy” stands in Hong Kong’s Victoria Park on June 4 last year, before the annual candlelight vigil commemorating the crackdown on pro-democracy protests in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square. Photo: EPA-EFE A statue of the “Goddess of Democracy” stands in Hong Kong’s Victoria Park on June 4 last year, before the annual candlelight vigil commemorating the crackdown on pro-democracy protests in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square. Photo: EPA-EFE
A statue of the “Goddess of Democracy” stands in Hong Kong’s Victoria Park on June 4 last year, before the annual candlelight vigil commemorating the crackdown on pro-democracy protests in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square. Photo: EPA-EFE
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