Commuters wait for an MTR train at Central Station in Hong Kong. Not having to travel to work translates to reduced exposure to roadside air pollution and less stress navigating peak-hour crowds. Photo: Bloomberg Commuters wait for an MTR train at Central Station in Hong Kong. Not having to travel to work translates to reduced exposure to roadside air pollution and less stress navigating peak-hour crowds. Photo: Bloomberg
Commuters wait for an MTR train at Central Station in Hong Kong. Not having to travel to work translates to reduced exposure to roadside air pollution and less stress navigating peak-hour crowds. Photo: Bloomberg

Letters | Working from home is kinder to the environment, and to ourselves: tech savvy Hong Kong take note

  • The coronavirus pandemic helped us discover the positive impact of remote working, not just on our well-being, but also on the environment as we cut down on the daily commute
  • Next, we should decentralise the business district, and opt for urban planning that supports a low-impact lifestyle and high quality of life

Topic |   Coronavirus pandemic: All stories
Commuters wait for an MTR train at Central Station in Hong Kong. Not having to travel to work translates to reduced exposure to roadside air pollution and less stress navigating peak-hour crowds. Photo: Bloomberg Commuters wait for an MTR train at Central Station in Hong Kong. Not having to travel to work translates to reduced exposure to roadside air pollution and less stress navigating peak-hour crowds. Photo: Bloomberg
Commuters wait for an MTR train at Central Station in Hong Kong. Not having to travel to work translates to reduced exposure to roadside air pollution and less stress navigating peak-hour crowds. Photo: Bloomberg
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