A man repairs a damaged logo in front of a Burberry store in Shanghai on March 26. The British designer was the first luxury brand to be targeted in China in a backlash against Western sanctions imposed over alleged human rights abuses in the Xinjiang region, after retailers including H&M and Nike were boycotted by Chinese shoppers over voicing concerns about cotton sourced from the Chinese region. Photo: EPA-EFE A man repairs a damaged logo in front of a Burberry store in Shanghai on March 26. The British designer was the first luxury brand to be targeted in China in a backlash against Western sanctions imposed over alleged human rights abuses in the Xinjiang region, after retailers including H&M and Nike were boycotted by Chinese shoppers over voicing concerns about cotton sourced from the Chinese region. Photo: EPA-EFE
A man repairs a damaged logo in front of a Burberry store in Shanghai on March 26. The British designer was the first luxury brand to be targeted in China in a backlash against Western sanctions imposed over alleged human rights abuses in the Xinjiang region, after retailers including H&M and Nike were boycotted by Chinese shoppers over voicing concerns about cotton sourced from the Chinese region. Photo: EPA-EFE
Xinjiang cotton

Letters | Xinjiang cotton: can China boycott the world’s garment makers?

  • Beijing’s use of bans and boycotts is a double-edged sword and, this time around, boycott supporters may have bitten off more than they can chew

Topic |   Xinjiang cotton
A man repairs a damaged logo in front of a Burberry store in Shanghai on March 26. The British designer was the first luxury brand to be targeted in China in a backlash against Western sanctions imposed over alleged human rights abuses in the Xinjiang region, after retailers including H&M and Nike were boycotted by Chinese shoppers over voicing concerns about cotton sourced from the Chinese region. Photo: EPA-EFE A man repairs a damaged logo in front of a Burberry store in Shanghai on March 26. The British designer was the first luxury brand to be targeted in China in a backlash against Western sanctions imposed over alleged human rights abuses in the Xinjiang region, after retailers including H&M and Nike were boycotted by Chinese shoppers over voicing concerns about cotton sourced from the Chinese region. Photo: EPA-EFE
A man repairs a damaged logo in front of a Burberry store in Shanghai on March 26. The British designer was the first luxury brand to be targeted in China in a backlash against Western sanctions imposed over alleged human rights abuses in the Xinjiang region, after retailers including H&M and Nike were boycotted by Chinese shoppers over voicing concerns about cotton sourced from the Chinese region. Photo: EPA-EFE
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