Stephen Wong Kai-yi, then privacy commissioner for personal data, briefs the media on more than 600 doxxing cases, on August 28, 2019, as anti-government protests  raged in Hong Kong. The victims were police officers and protesters from both political camps. Photo: Nora Tam Stephen Wong Kai-yi, then privacy commissioner for personal data, briefs the media on more than 600 doxxing cases, on August 28, 2019, as anti-government protests  raged in Hong Kong. The victims were police officers and protesters from both political camps. Photo: Nora Tam
Stephen Wong Kai-yi, then privacy commissioner for personal data, briefs the media on more than 600 doxxing cases, on August 28, 2019, as anti-government protests raged in Hong Kong. The victims were police officers and protesters from both political camps. Photo: Nora Tam

Letters | If Hong Kong wants to stop doxxing, the law must also fight fake news

  • Those doing the doxxing usually also concoct fake news about their target. Rules should be in place to stop doxxers from making up facts to fool the public and achieve their goal of putting innocent targets in harm’s way

Topic |   Doxxing and cyberbullying
Stephen Wong Kai-yi, then privacy commissioner for personal data, briefs the media on more than 600 doxxing cases, on August 28, 2019, as anti-government protests  raged in Hong Kong. The victims were police officers and protesters from both political camps. Photo: Nora Tam Stephen Wong Kai-yi, then privacy commissioner for personal data, briefs the media on more than 600 doxxing cases, on August 28, 2019, as anti-government protests  raged in Hong Kong. The victims were police officers and protesters from both political camps. Photo: Nora Tam
Stephen Wong Kai-yi, then privacy commissioner for personal data, briefs the media on more than 600 doxxing cases, on August 28, 2019, as anti-government protests raged in Hong Kong. The victims were police officers and protesters from both political camps. Photo: Nora Tam
READ FULL ARTICLE