Bronze medallist in the long jump Naoto Tajima of Japan, gold medallist Jesse Owens of the United States and silver medallist Lutz Long of Germany salute during the medals ceremony on August 11, 1936, at the Summer Olympics in Berlin. Owens dominated the 1936 games with four gold medals, refuting Nazi claims of white racial superiority; he and Long reportedly became lifelong friends. Photo: AP
Bronze medallist in the long jump Naoto Tajima of Japan, gold medallist Jesse Owens of the United States and silver medallist Lutz Long of Germany salute during the medals ceremony on August 11, 1936, at the Summer Olympics in Berlin. Owens dominated the 1936 games with four gold medals, refuting Nazi claims of white racial superiority; he and Long reportedly became lifelong friends. Photo: AP

Letters | Olympic history shows sports and politics are intertwined – but athletes can bring harmony

  • Readers discuss the Olympic Games, Covid-19 hardships in Hong Kong and the mainland, and Chinese reactions to the call for baby-boosting slogans

Bronze medallist in the long jump Naoto Tajima of Japan, gold medallist Jesse Owens of the United States and silver medallist Lutz Long of Germany salute during the medals ceremony on August 11, 1936, at the Summer Olympics in Berlin. Owens dominated the 1936 games with four gold medals, refuting Nazi claims of white racial superiority; he and Long reportedly became lifelong friends. Photo: AP
Bronze medallist in the long jump Naoto Tajima of Japan, gold medallist Jesse Owens of the United States and silver medallist Lutz Long of Germany salute during the medals ceremony on August 11, 1936, at the Summer Olympics in Berlin. Owens dominated the 1936 games with four gold medals, refuting Nazi claims of white racial superiority; he and Long reportedly became lifelong friends. Photo: AP
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