Acting US Secretary of Defence Patrick Shanahan (left) and Chinese Defence Minister Wei Fenghe meet on the sidelines of the Shangri-La Dialogue in Singapore on May 31. Photo: AP Acting US Secretary of Defence Patrick Shanahan (left) and Chinese Defence Minister Wei Fenghe meet on the sidelines of the Shangri-La Dialogue in Singapore on May 31. Photo: AP
Acting US Secretary of Defence Patrick Shanahan (left) and Chinese Defence Minister Wei Fenghe meet on the sidelines of the Shangri-La Dialogue in Singapore on May 31. Photo: AP
Lucio Blanco Pitlo III
Opinion

Opinion

Lucio Blanco Pitlo III

As US-China great power rivalry intensifies, smaller states in Southeast Asia seek a way to thrive, not just survive

  • From trade to the South China Sea and technology, the US and China increasingly find themselves at odds, with regional nations caught in the middle. Many are realising the importance of staying friendly with both but beholden to neither

Acting US Secretary of Defence Patrick Shanahan (left) and Chinese Defence Minister Wei Fenghe meet on the sidelines of the Shangri-La Dialogue in Singapore on May 31. Photo: AP Acting US Secretary of Defence Patrick Shanahan (left) and Chinese Defence Minister Wei Fenghe meet on the sidelines of the Shangri-La Dialogue in Singapore on May 31. Photo: AP
Acting US Secretary of Defence Patrick Shanahan (left) and Chinese Defence Minister Wei Fenghe meet on the sidelines of the Shangri-La Dialogue in Singapore on May 31. Photo: AP
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Lucio Blanco Pitlo III

Lucio Blanco Pitlo III

Lucio Blanco Pitlo III is a research fellow at the Asia-Pacific Pathways to Progress Foundation, fellow at the University of the Philippines Korea Research Centre, lecturer at the Chinese Studies Programme at Ateneo de Manila University, and contributing editor (Reviews) for the Asian Politics & Policy Journal.