A worker inspects soybeans during the soy harvest near the town of Campos Lindos, Brazil. Brazil’s soy production took off as Japan sought to diversify its suppliers of the crop in the 1970s, and China is now benefiting from the South American country’s harvests as the trade war rages. Photo: Reuters
Neal Kimberley
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Neal Kimberley

From rare earths to soy, the trade war will force the US and China to diversify supply

  • The US has started looking into alternative suppliers for the elements that power hi-tech. Beijing has already done the same with soy, and even a trade war resolution won’t stop this process

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A worker inspects soybeans during the soy harvest near the town of Campos Lindos, Brazil. Brazil’s soy production took off as Japan sought to diversify its suppliers of the crop in the 1970s, and China is now benefiting from the South American country’s harvests as the trade war rages. Photo: Reuters
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A trader works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. The US bond market is pricing on the assumption the US-China trade war will deliver a deflationary bust. Photo: Bloomberg
Tom Holland
Opinion

Opinion

Abacus by Tom Holland

US-China trade war: the financial markets are focused on the wrong risk

  • US bond market investors have been acting in a terrifying fashion, assuming a deflationary shock is ahead.
  • Such logic ignores trends from the last 30 years of globalisation

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A trader works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. The US bond market is pricing on the assumption the US-China trade war will deliver a deflationary bust. Photo: Bloomberg
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