A poster spells out the mood as protesters rally in the arrivals hall of Hong Kong International Airport on August 9. The demonstrations were part of a three-day sit-in to call for the withdrawal of a suspended extradition bill and the introduction of universal suffrage, as well as to raise awareness among international visitors about alleged police brutality against protesters. Photo: EPA-EFE
Mike Rowse
Opinion

Opinion

Mike Rowse

Carrie Lam must address legitimate demands to end the Hong Kong protests in time for Chinese National Day

  • With the 70th birthday of the People’s Republic just weeks away, it is imperative that the Hong Kong government urgently address mainstream grievances
  • It should withdraw the extradition bill, order an independent inquiry and introduce electoral reform

TOP PICKS

A poster spells out the mood as protesters rally in the arrivals hall of Hong Kong International Airport on August 9. The demonstrations were part of a three-day sit-in to call for the withdrawal of a suspended extradition bill and the introduction of universal suffrage, as well as to raise awareness among international visitors about alleged police brutality against protesters. Photo: EPA-EFE
READ FULL ARTICLE
An injured man is attended to as he sits on the street after a clash during a protest in Tsuen Wan on August 5. Photo: AFP
Brian YS Wong
Opinion

Opinion

Brian YS Wong

To end the violence, both sides must step back but it’s up to Carrie Lam, as Hong Kong’s leader, to broker a ceasefire

  • Protesters feel that if they stop or restrict themselves to non-violent methods, the government will concede nothing. Both sides need to de-escalate, but the responsibility falls on the administration to take the initiative

TOP PICKS

An injured man is attended to as he sits on the street after a clash during a protest in Tsuen Wan on August 5. Photo: AFP
READ FULL ARTICLE