Then British foreign secretary Boris Johnson shakes hands with US President Donald Trump at the UN headquarters in New York in September 2017. Trump rode to the presidency on a hard-line position towards China, much as Johnson became British prime minister thanks to his stance on the European Union, and now it’s unclear whether either can resolve those disputes. Photo: AFP
Nicholas Spiro
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Nicholas Spiro

Proposed US-China trade and Brexit deals have spurred investor excitement – and once again, it’s premature

  • Investors can’t help but get excited hearing that deals resolving Brexit and the US-China trade war are on the cards But their optimism fails to account for the frail foundations both deals rest on, and that neither is the first of its kind to fail

TOP PICKS

Then British foreign secretary Boris Johnson shakes hands with US President Donald Trump at the UN headquarters in New York in September 2017. Trump rode to the presidency on a hard-line position towards China, much as Johnson became British prime minister thanks to his stance on the European Union, and now it’s unclear whether either can resolve those disputes. Photo: AFP
READ FULL ARTICLE
US President Donald Trump (right) shakes hands with Liu He, China's vice-premier, at the White House in Washington on Friday. Trump said he and Chinese President Xi Jinping could sign the partial trade accord as soon as next month. Photo: Bloomberg
Neal Kimberley
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Neal Kimberley

How the US-China trade talks ‘love fest’ may hit a snag over currency complexities

  • Trump is selling loved-up negotiations but the trade complexities are unchanged. Beijing is wary of any currency deal reminiscent of the 1985 Plaza Accord while the US has yet to decide if it wants a truly free-floating yuan

TOP PICKS

US President Donald Trump (right) shakes hands with Liu He, China's vice-premier, at the White House in Washington on Friday. Trump said he and Chinese President Xi Jinping could sign the partial trade accord as soon as next month. Photo: Bloomberg
READ FULL ARTICLE