A protester holds up a poster during a march on June 9 against the Hong Kong government’s decision to amend the city’s extradition law to allow the transfer of prisoners to mainland China. Since then, the protests have spiralled into violence. Photo: Xiaomei Chen A protester holds up a poster during a march on June 9 against the Hong Kong government’s decision to amend the city’s extradition law to allow the transfer of prisoners to mainland China. Since then, the protests have spiralled into violence. Photo: Xiaomei Chen
A protester holds up a poster during a march on June 9 against the Hong Kong government’s decision to amend the city’s extradition law to allow the transfer of prisoners to mainland China. Since then, the protests have spiralled into violence. Photo: Xiaomei Chen
Tom Plate
Opinion

Opinion

Tom Plate

To end the Hong Kong protests, the Chinese leadership must blink first and offer to negotiate

  • In a protracted dispute, the stronger party must initiate negotiations so that the other side does not feel it has been forced to surrender
  • By directing the Hong Kong government to offer to start unconditional negotiations, China’s leaders can show the world a more nuanced face amid the trade war

A protester holds up a poster during a march on June 9 against the Hong Kong government’s decision to amend the city’s extradition law to allow the transfer of prisoners to mainland China. Since then, the protests have spiralled into violence. Photo: Xiaomei Chen A protester holds up a poster during a march on June 9 against the Hong Kong government’s decision to amend the city’s extradition law to allow the transfer of prisoners to mainland China. Since then, the protests have spiralled into violence. Photo: Xiaomei Chen
A protester holds up a poster during a march on June 9 against the Hong Kong government’s decision to amend the city’s extradition law to allow the transfer of prisoners to mainland China. Since then, the protests have spiralled into violence. Photo: Xiaomei Chen
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Tom Plate

Tom Plate

Tom Plate is a university professor and a veteran columnist focused on Asia and America. This Distinguished Scholar of Asian and Pacific Studies at Loyola Marymount University has orchestrated live interactive seminars with major universities across Asia, as part of the LMU’s path-finding Asia Media International Centre. He is also the author of 13 books, including the bestsellers “Confessions of an American Media Man” (2007), four volumes in the “Giants of Asia” series, and three In the 'Tom Plate on Asia' book series. He is vice-president of the Pacific Century Institute, in Los Angeles.