A protester holds up a poster during a march on June 9 against the Hong Kong government’s decision to amend the city’s extradition law to allow the transfer of prisoners to mainland China. Since then, the protests have spiralled into violence. Photo: Xiaomei Chen
Tom Plate
Opinion

Opinion

Tom Plate

To end the Hong Kong protests, the Chinese leadership must blink first and offer to negotiate

  • In a protracted dispute, the stronger party must initiate negotiations so that the other side does not feel it has been forced to surrender
  • By directing the Hong Kong government to offer to start unconditional negotiations, China’s leaders can show the world a more nuanced face amid the trade war

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A protester holds up a poster during a march on June 9 against the Hong Kong government’s decision to amend the city’s extradition law to allow the transfer of prisoners to mainland China. Since then, the protests have spiralled into violence. Photo: Xiaomei Chen
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Chief Secretary Matthew Cheung Kin-chung, then acting chief executive, meets the press before an Executive Council meeting at the government headquarters in Tamar, Admiralty, on October 22. Photo: May Tse
Viswa Nathan
Opinion

Opinion

Viswa Nathan

As Hong Kong’s protests rage on, Chief Secretary Matthew Cheung has become an inadvertent voice of reason

  • While Hong Kong’s second most senior official sparked ridicule when he said he could not point to the exact source of public anger in the absence of a public-opinion poll, such a survey is urgently needed

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Chief Secretary Matthew Cheung Kin-chung, then acting chief executive, meets the press before an Executive Council meeting at the government headquarters in Tamar, Admiralty, on October 22. Photo: May Tse
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