Many academics argue that the modern “repurposing” of punctuation is part of a natural linguistic progression, and that our texters are, in reality, paying very close attention to the details of language. Photo: Getty Many academics argue that the modern “repurposing” of punctuation is part of a natural linguistic progression, and that our texters are, in reality, paying very close attention to the details of language. Photo: Getty
Many academics argue that the modern “repurposing” of punctuation is part of a natural linguistic progression, and that our texters are, in reality, paying very close attention to the details of language. Photo: Getty
David Dodwell
Opinion

Opinion

Outside In by David Dodwell

Smartphones and WhatsApp leave the apostrophe in a sad state of decline – but at least it still has its protectors

  • Signs around the world still misuse the apostrophe and texters disregard it completely. But at least the Apostrophe Protection Society has recently reversed its decision to fold following a surge in interest

Many academics argue that the modern “repurposing” of punctuation is part of a natural linguistic progression, and that our texters are, in reality, paying very close attention to the details of language. Photo: Getty Many academics argue that the modern “repurposing” of punctuation is part of a natural linguistic progression, and that our texters are, in reality, paying very close attention to the details of language. Photo: Getty
Many academics argue that the modern “repurposing” of punctuation is part of a natural linguistic progression, and that our texters are, in reality, paying very close attention to the details of language. Photo: Getty
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David Dodwell

David Dodwell

David Dodwell is the executive director of the Hong Kong-APEC Trade Policy Study Group, a trade policy think tank.