A man shops for tomatoes at a market in Hong Kong on February 3. World food inflation was already heading higher in the fourth quarter of 2019. That trend may continue. Photo: AP A man shops for tomatoes at a market in Hong Kong on February 3. World food inflation was already heading higher in the fourth quarter of 2019. That trend may continue. Photo: AP
A man shops for tomatoes at a market in Hong Kong on February 3. World food inflation was already heading higher in the fourth quarter of 2019. That trend may continue. Photo: AP
Neal Kimberley
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Neal Kimberley

How the coronavirus outbreak could trigger a rise in global food prices

  • With China focused on averting a pandemic and the US Fed fretting over weak inflation, authorities in both countries look set to keep monetary policy settings accommodative for longer. That may well prompt capital to flow into soft commodities

A man shops for tomatoes at a market in Hong Kong on February 3. World food inflation was already heading higher in the fourth quarter of 2019. That trend may continue. Photo: AP A man shops for tomatoes at a market in Hong Kong on February 3. World food inflation was already heading higher in the fourth quarter of 2019. That trend may continue. Photo: AP
A man shops for tomatoes at a market in Hong Kong on February 3. World food inflation was already heading higher in the fourth quarter of 2019. That trend may continue. Photo: AP
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Neal Kimberley

Neal Kimberley

UK-based Neal Kimberley has been active in the financial markets since 1985. Having worked in sales and trading in the dealing rooms of major banks in London for many years, he moved to ThomsonReuters in 2009 to provide market analysis. He has been contributing to the Post since 2015 and writes about macroeconomics from a market perspective, with a particular emphasis on currencies and interest rates.