People walk along Orne Harbour, Antarctica, on February 6. The melting of Antarctic ice is causing sea levels to rise 3mm a year, a process that will only speed up as the region records higher temperatures. Photo: Reuters People walk along Orne Harbour, Antarctica, on February 6. The melting of Antarctic ice is causing sea levels to rise 3mm a year, a process that will only speed up as the region records higher temperatures. Photo: Reuters
People walk along Orne Harbour, Antarctica, on February 6. The melting of Antarctic ice is causing sea levels to rise 3mm a year, a process that will only speed up as the region records higher temperatures. Photo: Reuters
David Dodwell
Opinion

Opinion

Inside Out by David Dodwell

Coronavirus might be the world’s immediate challenge, but Antarctic heat record should worry us more

  • With the temperature at an Antarctic research base hitting 18.3 degrees this month and evidence of ice melting faster in the ‘doomsday glacier’, predictions of a 2-metre rise in sea levels seem more real. Governments, including Hong Kong’s, seem callously ill prepared

People walk along Orne Harbour, Antarctica, on February 6. The melting of Antarctic ice is causing sea levels to rise 3mm a year, a process that will only speed up as the region records higher temperatures. Photo: Reuters People walk along Orne Harbour, Antarctica, on February 6. The melting of Antarctic ice is causing sea levels to rise 3mm a year, a process that will only speed up as the region records higher temperatures. Photo: Reuters
People walk along Orne Harbour, Antarctica, on February 6. The melting of Antarctic ice is causing sea levels to rise 3mm a year, a process that will only speed up as the region records higher temperatures. Photo: Reuters
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David Dodwell

David Dodwell

David Dodwell is the executive director of the Hong Kong-APEC Trade Policy Study Group, a trade policy think tank.