Rows of Hyundai cars are parked for shipping in the southeastern port of Ulsan in South Korea. Hyundai has suspended work at a factory in Ulsan, hamstrung by a lack of parts as the coronavirus outbreak cripples China’s industrial output. Photo: AFP Rows of Hyundai cars are parked for shipping in the southeastern port of Ulsan in South Korea. Hyundai has suspended work at a factory in Ulsan, hamstrung by a lack of parts as the coronavirus outbreak cripples China’s industrial output. Photo: AFP
Rows of Hyundai cars are parked for shipping in the southeastern port of Ulsan in South Korea. Hyundai has suspended work at a factory in Ulsan, hamstrung by a lack of parts as the coronavirus outbreak cripples China’s industrial output. Photo: AFP
Neal Kimberley
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Neal Kimberley

Coronavirus: As crisis drags on, cracks show in global supply chains

  • After decades of offshoring manufacturing to China, the disruption to supply chains caused by the Covid-19 outbreak may prompt some sectors to consider diversifying production
  • The car and smartphone industries have proved quite vulnerable

Rows of Hyundai cars are parked for shipping in the southeastern port of Ulsan in South Korea. Hyundai has suspended work at a factory in Ulsan, hamstrung by a lack of parts as the coronavirus outbreak cripples China’s industrial output. Photo: AFP Rows of Hyundai cars are parked for shipping in the southeastern port of Ulsan in South Korea. Hyundai has suspended work at a factory in Ulsan, hamstrung by a lack of parts as the coronavirus outbreak cripples China’s industrial output. Photo: AFP
Rows of Hyundai cars are parked for shipping in the southeastern port of Ulsan in South Korea. Hyundai has suspended work at a factory in Ulsan, hamstrung by a lack of parts as the coronavirus outbreak cripples China’s industrial output. Photo: AFP
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Neal Kimberley

Neal Kimberley

UK-based Neal Kimberley has been active in the financial markets since 1985. Having worked in sales and trading in the dealing rooms of major banks in London for many years, he moved to ThomsonReuters in 2009 to provide market analysis. He has been contributing to the Post since 2015 and writes about macroeconomics from a market perspective, with a particular emphasis on currencies and interest rates.