The most productive car factory in the world fell quiet on February 7 as South Korea’s Hyundai suspended operations at its giant Ulsan complex, hamstrung by a lack of parts as the coronavirus outbreak crippled China's industrial output. Photo: AFP The most productive car factory in the world fell quiet on February 7 as South Korea’s Hyundai suspended operations at its giant Ulsan complex, hamstrung by a lack of parts as the coronavirus outbreak crippled China's industrial output. Photo: AFP
The most productive car factory in the world fell quiet on February 7 as South Korea’s Hyundai suspended operations at its giant Ulsan complex, hamstrung by a lack of parts as the coronavirus outbreak crippled China's industrial output. Photo: AFP
Stephen Olson
Opinion

Opinion

The View by Stephen Olson

Coronavirus chaos can prompt a needed rethink on global trade and economic integration

  • Confidence in the benefits of trade and integration has suffered as trade wars highlight the risks of interdependence, and tech advances weaken the economic rationale for far-flung supply chains
  • The coronavirus and its disruptions might finally push the world to consider a new trading order

The most productive car factory in the world fell quiet on February 7 as South Korea’s Hyundai suspended operations at its giant Ulsan complex, hamstrung by a lack of parts as the coronavirus outbreak crippled China's industrial output. Photo: AFP The most productive car factory in the world fell quiet on February 7 as South Korea’s Hyundai suspended operations at its giant Ulsan complex, hamstrung by a lack of parts as the coronavirus outbreak crippled China's industrial output. Photo: AFP
The most productive car factory in the world fell quiet on February 7 as South Korea’s Hyundai suspended operations at its giant Ulsan complex, hamstrung by a lack of parts as the coronavirus outbreak crippled China's industrial output. Photo: AFP
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