Liquidity matters – it is access to money, and to a large extent that means access to US dollar liquidity, that keeps the global financial system functioning smoothly. Photo: Xinhua Liquidity matters – it is access to money, and to a large extent that means access to US dollar liquidity, that keeps the global financial system functioning smoothly. Photo: Xinhua
Liquidity matters – it is access to money, and to a large extent that means access to US dollar liquidity, that keeps the global financial system functioning smoothly. Photo: Xinhua
Neal Kimberley
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Neal Kimberley

US Fed rate cut alone won’t steady a global economy shaken by the coronavirus

  • The dramatic spike in demand for safe-haven 10-year Treasuries, raising the spectre of an inverted yield curve, is a sign that markets expect more from the Fed
  • The central bank must ensure access to US dollar liquidity remains open, at a time spooked consumers stockpile certain goods and banks stockpile US dollars

Liquidity matters – it is access to money, and to a large extent that means access to US dollar liquidity, that keeps the global financial system functioning smoothly. Photo: Xinhua Liquidity matters – it is access to money, and to a large extent that means access to US dollar liquidity, that keeps the global financial system functioning smoothly. Photo: Xinhua
Liquidity matters – it is access to money, and to a large extent that means access to US dollar liquidity, that keeps the global financial system functioning smoothly. Photo: Xinhua
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