A man wearing a mask stands before the city skyline on the first day of the Lunar New Year of the Rat in Tsim Sha Tsui, Hong Kong, on January 25. Photo: AFP A man wearing a mask stands before the city skyline on the first day of the Lunar New Year of the Rat in Tsim Sha Tsui, Hong Kong, on January 25. Photo: AFP
A man wearing a mask stands before the city skyline on the first day of the Lunar New Year of the Rat in Tsim Sha Tsui, Hong Kong, on January 25. Photo: AFP
David Dodwell
Opinion

Opinion

Outside In by David Dodwell

With the coronavirus beginning to exact its economic cost, Hong Kong must brace itself for a tide of woe

  • Unemployment and bankruptcy figures are beginning to hint at the ravages of the economic damage. Financial Secretary Paul Chan may have to dip further into the city’s massive fiscal reserves to provide a safety net

A man wearing a mask stands before the city skyline on the first day of the Lunar New Year of the Rat in Tsim Sha Tsui, Hong Kong, on January 25. Photo: AFP A man wearing a mask stands before the city skyline on the first day of the Lunar New Year of the Rat in Tsim Sha Tsui, Hong Kong, on January 25. Photo: AFP
A man wearing a mask stands before the city skyline on the first day of the Lunar New Year of the Rat in Tsim Sha Tsui, Hong Kong, on January 25. Photo: AFP
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David Dodwell

David Dodwell

David Dodwell is the executive director of the Hong Kong-APEC Trade Policy Study Group, a trade policy think tank.