Barges and freight carriers are moored in the Yangtze River, near Nantong, Jiangsu province, on March 24. The dismal Chinese economic data for January and February made even the most pessimistic projection look optimistic. Photo: Bloomberg Barges and freight carriers are moored in the Yangtze River, near Nantong, Jiangsu province, on March 24. The dismal Chinese economic data for January and February made even the most pessimistic projection look optimistic. Photo: Bloomberg
Barges and freight carriers are moored in the Yangtze River, near Nantong, Jiangsu province, on March 24. The dismal Chinese economic data for January and February made even the most pessimistic projection look optimistic. Photo: Bloomberg
Aidan Yao
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Aidan Yao

China is winning the coronavirus battle but losing the economic war

  • The battering the economy took in January and February is only now becoming clear. But with the pandemic raging, Beijing should expect more economic convulsions. The damage is likely to be greater than any stimulus policymakers can muster

Barges and freight carriers are moored in the Yangtze River, near Nantong, Jiangsu province, on March 24. The dismal Chinese economic data for January and February made even the most pessimistic projection look optimistic. Photo: Bloomberg Barges and freight carriers are moored in the Yangtze River, near Nantong, Jiangsu province, on March 24. The dismal Chinese economic data for January and February made even the most pessimistic projection look optimistic. Photo: Bloomberg
Barges and freight carriers are moored in the Yangtze River, near Nantong, Jiangsu province, on March 24. The dismal Chinese economic data for January and February made even the most pessimistic projection look optimistic. Photo: Bloomberg
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