Pedestrians ride an escalator near an overpass with an electronic board showing stock information at the Lujiazui financial district in Shanghai on March 17. Photo: Reuters Pedestrians ride an escalator near an overpass with an electronic board showing stock information at the Lujiazui financial district in Shanghai on March 17. Photo: Reuters
Pedestrians ride an escalator near an overpass with an electronic board showing stock information at the Lujiazui financial district in Shanghai on March 17. Photo: Reuters
Nicholas Spiro
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Nicholas Spiro

As the coronavirus rocks financial markets worldwide, China is not the safe bet investors hope it is

  • The Chinese stock market has not fallen as steeply as its peers, the yuan has proved resilient and the domestic bond market has attracted strong inflows
  • However, it is too early to say whether China will be hit by a second wave of infections, and the strain on global supply chains does not bode well for the country

Pedestrians ride an escalator near an overpass with an electronic board showing stock information at the Lujiazui financial district in Shanghai on March 17. Photo: Reuters Pedestrians ride an escalator near an overpass with an electronic board showing stock information at the Lujiazui financial district in Shanghai on March 17. Photo: Reuters
Pedestrians ride an escalator near an overpass with an electronic board showing stock information at the Lujiazui financial district in Shanghai on March 17. Photo: Reuters
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Nicholas Spiro

Nicholas Spiro

Nicholas Spiro is a partner at Lauressa Advisory, a specialist London-based real estate and macroeconomic advisory firm. He is an expert on advanced and emerging economies and a regular commentator on financial and macro-political developments.