Employees in protective gear sort face masks at Zonsen Medical Products factory in Wuhan on April 12. In light of the coronavirus pandemic, governments are likely to pay more attention to medical supplies, deploying industrial policies to reduce dependence on imports and ensure sufficient domestic capacity in case of another outbreak. Photo: EPA-EFE Employees in protective gear sort face masks at Zonsen Medical Products factory in Wuhan on April 12. In light of the coronavirus pandemic, governments are likely to pay more attention to medical supplies, deploying industrial policies to reduce dependence on imports and ensure sufficient domestic capacity in case of another outbreak. Photo: EPA-EFE
Employees in protective gear sort face masks at Zonsen Medical Products factory in Wuhan on April 12. In light of the coronavirus pandemic, governments are likely to pay more attention to medical supplies, deploying industrial policies to reduce dependence on imports and ensure sufficient domestic capacity in case of another outbreak. Photo: EPA-EFE
Tai Hui
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Tai Hui

The coronavirus won’t kill globalisation, but might just change global business for the better

  • Look out for changes to industrial policies as governments realise the need to prioritise sectors such as medical supplies, to meet domestic needs in time of crisis
  • While companies will push to diversify supply chains and pay more attention to ESG factors, their preference for globalisation – and the profits it brings – won’t change

Employees in protective gear sort face masks at Zonsen Medical Products factory in Wuhan on April 12. In light of the coronavirus pandemic, governments are likely to pay more attention to medical supplies, deploying industrial policies to reduce dependence on imports and ensure sufficient domestic capacity in case of another outbreak. Photo: EPA-EFE Employees in protective gear sort face masks at Zonsen Medical Products factory in Wuhan on April 12. In light of the coronavirus pandemic, governments are likely to pay more attention to medical supplies, deploying industrial policies to reduce dependence on imports and ensure sufficient domestic capacity in case of another outbreak. Photo: EPA-EFE
Employees in protective gear sort face masks at Zonsen Medical Products factory in Wuhan on April 12. In light of the coronavirus pandemic, governments are likely to pay more attention to medical supplies, deploying industrial policies to reduce dependence on imports and ensure sufficient domestic capacity in case of another outbreak. Photo: EPA-EFE
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