A Chinese student at Boston University works online while cuddling her cat at her home in Boston, Massachusetts, on March 27. While some feel online education is inadequate because of the decreased human interaction, other students find themselves more comfortable interacting with their teachers and peers through screens. Photo: Xinhua
Anirban Mukhopadhyay
Opinion

Opinion

Anirban Mukhopadhyay

Coronavirus pandemic has prompted a shift to online learning, raising questions about how we value education

  • Many feel online education should be cheaper than in-person classes. However, how people price goods and services is not entirely objective
  • The recent widespread adoption of e-learning should prompt reflection on the value of education and whether Hong Kong’s focus on exams is justified
A Chinese student at Boston University works online while cuddling her cat at her home in Boston, Massachusetts, on March 27. While some feel online education is inadequate because of the decreased human interaction, other students find themselves more comfortable interacting with their teachers and peers through screens. Photo: Xinhua
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