A woman wearing a face mask and traditional Chinese clothing visits Gubei Water Town on the first day of the five-day Labour Day holiday, on the outskirts of Beijing, on May 1. Domestic tourism offers opportunities for economies in recovery. Photo: Reuters A woman wearing a face mask and traditional Chinese clothing visits Gubei Water Town on the first day of the five-day Labour Day holiday, on the outskirts of Beijing, on May 1. Domestic tourism offers opportunities for economies in recovery. Photo: Reuters
A woman wearing a face mask and traditional Chinese clothing visits Gubei Water Town on the first day of the five-day Labour Day holiday, on the outskirts of Beijing, on May 1. Domestic tourism offers opportunities for economies in recovery. Photo: Reuters
David Dodwell
Opinion

Opinion

Outside In by David Dodwell

As global travel and tourism braces for a long slump, can Hong Kong overcome this existential challenge?

  • With no quick recovery in sight, Hong Kong’s massive hospitality sector is in peril. Economies with a big domestic tourism sector can hope for some respite – but will Hong Kong roll out the welcome mat for mainlanders?

A woman wearing a face mask and traditional Chinese clothing visits Gubei Water Town on the first day of the five-day Labour Day holiday, on the outskirts of Beijing, on May 1. Domestic tourism offers opportunities for economies in recovery. Photo: Reuters A woman wearing a face mask and traditional Chinese clothing visits Gubei Water Town on the first day of the five-day Labour Day holiday, on the outskirts of Beijing, on May 1. Domestic tourism offers opportunities for economies in recovery. Photo: Reuters
A woman wearing a face mask and traditional Chinese clothing visits Gubei Water Town on the first day of the five-day Labour Day holiday, on the outskirts of Beijing, on May 1. Domestic tourism offers opportunities for economies in recovery. Photo: Reuters
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