The China Consulate General in Houston is seen without the Chinese national flag on July 24, after the US government ordered its closure. Photo: EPA The China Consulate General in Houston is seen without the Chinese national flag on July 24, after the US government ordered its closure. Photo: EPA
The China Consulate General in Houston is seen without the Chinese national flag on July 24, after the US government ordered its closure. Photo: EPA
Neal Kimberley
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Neal Kimberley

Icy US-China relations and raging pandemic mean sliding dollar may have further to fall

  • While investors flocked to the safety of the greenback early in the pandemic, market perceptions have since changed
  • The George Floyd protests, the closures of consulates and the US’ coronavirus response have all made markets reassess their positions

The China Consulate General in Houston is seen without the Chinese national flag on July 24, after the US government ordered its closure. Photo: EPA The China Consulate General in Houston is seen without the Chinese national flag on July 24, after the US government ordered its closure. Photo: EPA
The China Consulate General in Houston is seen without the Chinese national flag on July 24, after the US government ordered its closure. Photo: EPA
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Neal Kimberley

Neal Kimberley

UK-based Neal Kimberley has been active in the financial markets since 1985. Having worked in sales and trading in the dealing rooms of major banks in London for many years, he moved to ThomsonReuters in 2009 to provide market analysis. He has been contributing to the Post since 2015 and writes about macroeconomics from a market perspective, with a particular emphasis on currencies and interest rates.