Visitors to Guilin’s “Four Lakes” scenic area take photos of the sunset on August 8. China’s July trade data showed a larger-than-expected bounce, but it will take a while for companies and consumers to return to full-on spending sprees. Photo: AFP Visitors to Guilin’s “Four Lakes” scenic area take photos of the sunset on August 8. China’s July trade data showed a larger-than-expected bounce, but it will take a while for companies and consumers to return to full-on spending sprees. Photo: AFP
Visitors to Guilin’s “Four Lakes” scenic area take photos of the sunset on August 8. China’s July trade data showed a larger-than-expected bounce, but it will take a while for companies and consumers to return to full-on spending sprees. Photo: AFP
David Brown
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by David Brown

Signs of recovery are welcome, but the global economy is still on course for a crash

  • The upturn in trade and job numbers and positive market sentiment are fuelled by the generous stimulus that policymakers will need to maintain at all costs
  • While the illusion of plenty lasts, a sustainable economic recovery built on business and consumer confidence must take root

Visitors to Guilin’s “Four Lakes” scenic area take photos of the sunset on August 8. China’s July trade data showed a larger-than-expected bounce, but it will take a while for companies and consumers to return to full-on spending sprees. Photo: AFP Visitors to Guilin’s “Four Lakes” scenic area take photos of the sunset on August 8. China’s July trade data showed a larger-than-expected bounce, but it will take a while for companies and consumers to return to full-on spending sprees. Photo: AFP
Visitors to Guilin’s “Four Lakes” scenic area take photos of the sunset on August 8. China’s July trade data showed a larger-than-expected bounce, but it will take a while for companies and consumers to return to full-on spending sprees. Photo: AFP
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David Brown

David Brown

David Brown is the chief executive of New View Economics. Over a career spanning four decades in London, David held roles as chief economist in a number of international investment banks.