Tens of thousands of anti-government protesters march in central Hong Kong on January 1 as they continue to pressure the government to meet their five demands, including greater democracy, amnesty for arrested protesters and an independent inquiry into police use of force. Photo: Kyodo Tens of thousands of anti-government protesters march in central Hong Kong on January 1 as they continue to pressure the government to meet their five demands, including greater democracy, amnesty for arrested protesters and an independent inquiry into police use of force. Photo: Kyodo
Tens of thousands of anti-government protesters march in central Hong Kong on January 1 as they continue to pressure the government to meet their five demands, including greater democracy, amnesty for arrested protesters and an independent inquiry into police use of force. Photo: Kyodo
Regina Ip
Opinion

Opinion

Regina Ip

Why Hong Kong does not need more democracy right now

  • The chaos and instability unleashed by the quest for universal suffrage, the gridlock in the legislature and the government’s declining efficacy support a halt in the expansion of democracy

Tens of thousands of anti-government protesters march in central Hong Kong on January 1 as they continue to pressure the government to meet their five demands, including greater democracy, amnesty for arrested protesters and an independent inquiry into police use of force. Photo: Kyodo Tens of thousands of anti-government protesters march in central Hong Kong on January 1 as they continue to pressure the government to meet their five demands, including greater democracy, amnesty for arrested protesters and an independent inquiry into police use of force. Photo: Kyodo
Tens of thousands of anti-government protesters march in central Hong Kong on January 1 as they continue to pressure the government to meet their five demands, including greater democracy, amnesty for arrested protesters and an independent inquiry into police use of force. Photo: Kyodo
READ FULL ARTICLE
Regina Ip

Regina Ip

Regina Ip served as Hong Kong's secretary for security from 1998 to 2003. After three years’ studies in the US, she returned to Hong Kong with a view to improving Hong Kong’s governance. She is now chairperson of New People’s Party and a legislator elected on Hong Kong Island.