People wait to cross a road in the Marunouchi district of Tokyo on August 28. The coronavirus crisis has given Abenomics a new lease of life, and the programme is unlikely to be reversed. Photo: Bloomberg People wait to cross a road in the Marunouchi district of Tokyo on August 28. The coronavirus crisis has given Abenomics a new lease of life, and the programme is unlikely to be reversed. Photo: Bloomberg
People wait to cross a road in the Marunouchi district of Tokyo on August 28. The coronavirus crisis has given Abenomics a new lease of life, and the programme is unlikely to be reversed. Photo: Bloomberg
Nicholas Spiro
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Nicholas Spiro

Abe is leaving office, but Abenomics is here to stay

  • The need for aggressive monetary easing, the most radical of Abe’s ‘three arrows’, was appreciated by the Fed and ECB even before Covid-19 struck. Given a boost by the pandemic, Abe’s experiment is now the norm in the world’s major economies

People wait to cross a road in the Marunouchi district of Tokyo on August 28. The coronavirus crisis has given Abenomics a new lease of life, and the programme is unlikely to be reversed. Photo: Bloomberg People wait to cross a road in the Marunouchi district of Tokyo on August 28. The coronavirus crisis has given Abenomics a new lease of life, and the programme is unlikely to be reversed. Photo: Bloomberg
People wait to cross a road in the Marunouchi district of Tokyo on August 28. The coronavirus crisis has given Abenomics a new lease of life, and the programme is unlikely to be reversed. Photo: Bloomberg
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Nicholas Spiro

Nicholas Spiro

Nicholas Spiro is a partner at Lauressa Advisory, a specialist London-based real estate and macroeconomic advisory firm. He is an expert on advanced and emerging economies and a regular commentator on financial and macro-political developments.