Health care professionals take a sample from a man at a centre in Queen Elizabeth Stadium in Wan Chai on September 1 as part of Hong Kong’s universal community testing programme. Photo: Sam Tsang Health care professionals take a sample from a man at a centre in Queen Elizabeth Stadium in Wan Chai on September 1 as part of Hong Kong’s universal community testing programme. Photo: Sam Tsang
Health care professionals take a sample from a man at a centre in Queen Elizabeth Stadium in Wan Chai on September 1 as part of Hong Kong’s universal community testing programme. Photo: Sam Tsang
Mike Rowse
Opinion

Opinion

Mike Rowse

Reaction to Hong Kong’s mass coronavirus testing reveals city’s Pavlovian politics

  • While the opposition tends to object to any proposal coming from the chief executive or the central government, Carrie Lam has also reacted defensively to legitimate questions about her policies

Health care professionals take a sample from a man at a centre in Queen Elizabeth Stadium in Wan Chai on September 1 as part of Hong Kong’s universal community testing programme. Photo: Sam Tsang Health care professionals take a sample from a man at a centre in Queen Elizabeth Stadium in Wan Chai on September 1 as part of Hong Kong’s universal community testing programme. Photo: Sam Tsang
Health care professionals take a sample from a man at a centre in Queen Elizabeth Stadium in Wan Chai on September 1 as part of Hong Kong’s universal community testing programme. Photo: Sam Tsang
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Mike Rowse

Mike Rowse

Mike Rowse has lived in Hong Kong since 1972, and is a naturalised Chinese citizen. He spent six years in the ICAC from 1974 to 1980, then 28 years in the government as an administrative officer until retirement in December 2008. He is now the search director for Stanton Chase International, and also hosts a radio talk show and writes regularly for both English and Chinese media.