US President Donald Trump gestures after addressing the first day of the Republican National Convention after delegates voted to confirm him as the Republican 2020 presidential nominee, in Charlotte, North Carolina, on August 24. Photo: Reuters US President Donald Trump gestures after addressing the first day of the Republican National Convention after delegates voted to confirm him as the Republican 2020 presidential nominee, in Charlotte, North Carolina, on August 24. Photo: Reuters
US President Donald Trump gestures after addressing the first day of the Republican National Convention after delegates voted to confirm him as the Republican 2020 presidential nominee, in Charlotte, North Carolina, on August 24. Photo: Reuters
David Brown
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by David Brown

Why US dollar bears should watch out for November’s presidential election

  • The dollar is being undermined by loose US monetary policy and uncertainty surrounding the outcome of the poll. The latter could mark a turning point for the currency
  • While Trump should manage the dollar in a globally responsible manner, Beijing has plenty of scope to target a weaker renminbi while inflation risks remain low

US President Donald Trump gestures after addressing the first day of the Republican National Convention after delegates voted to confirm him as the Republican 2020 presidential nominee, in Charlotte, North Carolina, on August 24. Photo: Reuters US President Donald Trump gestures after addressing the first day of the Republican National Convention after delegates voted to confirm him as the Republican 2020 presidential nominee, in Charlotte, North Carolina, on August 24. Photo: Reuters
US President Donald Trump gestures after addressing the first day of the Republican National Convention after delegates voted to confirm him as the Republican 2020 presidential nominee, in Charlotte, North Carolina, on August 24. Photo: Reuters
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David Brown

David Brown

David Brown is the chief executive of New View Economics. Over a career spanning four decades in London, David held roles as chief economist in a number of international investment banks.