A staff member waits to welcome guests in the lobby of the newly inaugurated Dolce Hanoi Golden Lake hotel, the world's first gold-plated hotel, in Hanoi on July 2. From an investor perspective, gold has been a safe haven for thousands of years. Photo: AFP A staff member waits to welcome guests in the lobby of the newly inaugurated Dolce Hanoi Golden Lake hotel, the world's first gold-plated hotel, in Hanoi on July 2. From an investor perspective, gold has been a safe haven for thousands of years. Photo: AFP
A staff member waits to welcome guests in the lobby of the newly inaugurated Dolce Hanoi Golden Lake hotel, the world's first gold-plated hotel, in Hanoi on July 2. From an investor perspective, gold has been a safe haven for thousands of years. Photo: AFP
Neal Kimberley
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Neal Kimberley

Gold continues to glitter for investors, thanks to the Fed’s policy change and US-China geopolitical tensions

  • The possibility that the recent change in Fed policy could mean higher inflation in the future could underpin the value of gold in the present
  • The run-up to the US presidential election and China-US geopolitical tensions are also bolstering gold’s safe-haven status

A staff member waits to welcome guests in the lobby of the newly inaugurated Dolce Hanoi Golden Lake hotel, the world's first gold-plated hotel, in Hanoi on July 2. From an investor perspective, gold has been a safe haven for thousands of years. Photo: AFP A staff member waits to welcome guests in the lobby of the newly inaugurated Dolce Hanoi Golden Lake hotel, the world's first gold-plated hotel, in Hanoi on July 2. From an investor perspective, gold has been a safe haven for thousands of years. Photo: AFP
A staff member waits to welcome guests in the lobby of the newly inaugurated Dolce Hanoi Golden Lake hotel, the world's first gold-plated hotel, in Hanoi on July 2. From an investor perspective, gold has been a safe haven for thousands of years. Photo: AFP
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Neal Kimberley

Neal Kimberley

UK-based Neal Kimberley has been active in the financial markets since 1985. Having worked in sales and trading in the dealing rooms of major banks in London for many years, he moved to ThomsonReuters in 2009 to provide market analysis. He has been contributing to the Post since 2015 and writes about macroeconomics from a market perspective, with a particular emphasis on currencies and interest rates.