Benny Tai Yiu-ting attends a press conference at the Shanghai Centre in Mong Kok on July 13. Tai’s dismissal from his tenured position at the University of Hong Kong has heightened fears that Hong Kong’s academic environment under the new national security law will become more restrictive with ill-defined “red lines”, much as it is in Singapore. Photo: Edmond SoBenny Tai Yiu-ting attends a press conference at the Shanghai Centre in Mong Kok on July 13. Tai’s dismissal from his tenured position at the University of Hong Kong has heightened fears that Hong Kong’s academic environment under the new national security law will become more restrictive with ill-defined “red lines”, much as it is in Singapore. Photo: Edmond So
Benny Tai Yiu-ting attends a press conference at the Shanghai Centre in Mong Kok on July 13. Tai’s dismissal from his tenured position at the University of Hong Kong has heightened fears that Hong Kong’s academic environment under the new national security law will become more restrictive with ill-defined “red lines”, much as it is in Singapore. Photo: Edmond So
Philip G. Altbach
Opinion

Opinion

Philip G. Altbach and Gerard A. Postiglione

Singapore’s limits show a possible future for Hong Kong academic freedom

  • Singapore has been an open academic society with considerable academic freedom and independence, but there are also restrictions – many of them unwritten
  • The Lion City highlights how carefully crafted limitations on such freedoms can coexist with a successful academic system

Benny Tai Yiu-ting attends a press conference at the Shanghai Centre in Mong Kok on July 13. Tai’s dismissal from his tenured position at the University of Hong Kong has heightened fears that Hong Kong’s academic environment under the new national security law will become more restrictive with ill-defined “red lines”, much as it is in Singapore. Photo: Edmond SoBenny Tai Yiu-ting attends a press conference at the Shanghai Centre in Mong Kok on July 13. Tai’s dismissal from his tenured position at the University of Hong Kong has heightened fears that Hong Kong’s academic environment under the new national security law will become more restrictive with ill-defined “red lines”, much as it is in Singapore. Photo: Edmond So
Benny Tai Yiu-ting attends a press conference at the Shanghai Centre in Mong Kok on July 13. Tai’s dismissal from his tenured position at the University of Hong Kong has heightened fears that Hong Kong’s academic environment under the new national security law will become more restrictive with ill-defined “red lines”, much as it is in Singapore. Photo: Edmond So
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