A construction site near Shanghai’s Lujiazui financial district. China’s infrastructure spending after the crisis of 2008 helped global growth, but it is unlikely to apply such measures this time. Photo: Reuters A construction site near Shanghai’s Lujiazui financial district. China’s infrastructure spending after the crisis of 2008 helped global growth, but it is unlikely to apply such measures this time. Photo: Reuters
A construction site near Shanghai’s Lujiazui financial district. China’s infrastructure spending after the crisis of 2008 helped global growth, but it is unlikely to apply such measures this time. Photo: Reuters
Anthony Rowley
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Anthony Rowley

US-China decoupling: a global depression is surely a bigger threat than China

  • China helped prop up the global economy with stimulus following the last financial crisis. Although it is the only major economy expected to grow this year, the geopolitical climate means Beijing is unlikely to help the world’s recovery as much this time

A construction site near Shanghai’s Lujiazui financial district. China’s infrastructure spending after the crisis of 2008 helped global growth, but it is unlikely to apply such measures this time. Photo: Reuters A construction site near Shanghai’s Lujiazui financial district. China’s infrastructure spending after the crisis of 2008 helped global growth, but it is unlikely to apply such measures this time. Photo: Reuters
A construction site near Shanghai’s Lujiazui financial district. China’s infrastructure spending after the crisis of 2008 helped global growth, but it is unlikely to apply such measures this time. Photo: Reuters
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