Fishing boats wait to be dismantled at Hongze Lake in Jiangsu province on November 3. The local authorities announced a ban on fishing in the lake to protect its biological resources. Photo: Zuma Wire/dpa Fishing boats wait to be dismantled at Hongze Lake in Jiangsu province on November 3. The local authorities announced a ban on fishing in the lake to protect its biological resources. Photo: Zuma Wire/dpa
Fishing boats wait to be dismantled at Hongze Lake in Jiangsu province on November 3. The local authorities announced a ban on fishing in the lake to protect its biological resources. Photo: Zuma Wire/dpa
David Dodwell
Opinion

Opinion

Inside Out by David Dodwell

As China’s demand for seafood grows, can it navigate a sustainable course?

  • A recent study predicts Chinese demand for seafood will outstrip supply by 2030, by as much as 18 million tonnes a year. As a result, the shape of the international fisheries trade is likely to shift dramatically

Fishing boats wait to be dismantled at Hongze Lake in Jiangsu province on November 3. The local authorities announced a ban on fishing in the lake to protect its biological resources. Photo: Zuma Wire/dpa Fishing boats wait to be dismantled at Hongze Lake in Jiangsu province on November 3. The local authorities announced a ban on fishing in the lake to protect its biological resources. Photo: Zuma Wire/dpa
Fishing boats wait to be dismantled at Hongze Lake in Jiangsu province on November 3. The local authorities announced a ban on fishing in the lake to protect its biological resources. Photo: Zuma Wire/dpa
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