While a mass dumping of US Treasuries by Beijing is unlikely, all eyes are on how China would respond to any sabre rattling by the Biden administration. Photo: AP While a mass dumping of US Treasuries by Beijing is unlikely, all eyes are on how China would respond to any sabre rattling by the Biden administration. Photo: AP
While a mass dumping of US Treasuries by Beijing is unlikely, all eyes are on how China would respond to any sabre rattling by the Biden administration. Photo: AP
David Brown
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by David Brown

Why China must tread carefully on dumping US debt

  • If Beijing is anxious about US sovereign credit risks, there are other investment options like the euro and gold, but they come with consequences on prices and exchange rates
  • After four years of trade tensions, the foremost task is for both sides to repair frayed relations

While a mass dumping of US Treasuries by Beijing is unlikely, all eyes are on how China would respond to any sabre rattling by the Biden administration. Photo: AP While a mass dumping of US Treasuries by Beijing is unlikely, all eyes are on how China would respond to any sabre rattling by the Biden administration. Photo: AP
While a mass dumping of US Treasuries by Beijing is unlikely, all eyes are on how China would respond to any sabre rattling by the Biden administration. Photo: AP
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David Brown

David Brown

David Brown is the chief executive of New View Economics. Over a career spanning four decades in London, David held roles as chief economist in a number of international investment banks.