Recent research indicates low levels of financial literacy across several countries that could exacerbate the economic impact of the Covid-19 pandemic. Photo: Shutterstock Recent research indicates low levels of financial literacy across several countries that could exacerbate the economic impact of the Covid-19 pandemic. Photo: Shutterstock
Recent research indicates low levels of financial literacy across several countries that could exacerbate the economic impact of the Covid-19 pandemic. Photo: Shutterstock
David Dodwell
Opinion

Opinion

Outside In by David Dodwell

Now, more than ever, we need to know how to manage our money. Yet many of us are financially illiterate

  • As Covid-19 brings hardship, we need to cut spending, conserve our savings and assume things are going to get worse for many months before any kind of recovery
  • However, recent research suggests near-crisis levels of financial illiteracy, raising the prospect of greater suffering until the pandemic is under control

Recent research indicates low levels of financial literacy across several countries that could exacerbate the economic impact of the Covid-19 pandemic. Photo: Shutterstock Recent research indicates low levels of financial literacy across several countries that could exacerbate the economic impact of the Covid-19 pandemic. Photo: Shutterstock
Recent research indicates low levels of financial literacy across several countries that could exacerbate the economic impact of the Covid-19 pandemic. Photo: Shutterstock
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David Dodwell

David Dodwell

David Dodwell is the executive director of the Hong Kong-APEC Trade Policy Study Group, a trade policy think tank.