Pedestrians in the Shibuya shopping district in Tokyo on February 24, 2020. Finance has traditionally been looked down on in Japan. Photo: Reuters Pedestrians in the Shibuya shopping district in Tokyo on February 24, 2020. Finance has traditionally been looked down on in Japan. Photo: Reuters
Pedestrians in the Shibuya shopping district in Tokyo on February 24, 2020. Finance has traditionally been looked down on in Japan. Photo: Reuters
Anthony Rowley
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Anthony Rowley

Japan is waking up to the true value of having a top financial centre – when will China?

  • The launch of FinCity.Tokyo is a sign that Japan realises a financial centre is a means to better deploy national wealth, such as its household savings, the largest in the world. China can take a leaf out of its book

Pedestrians in the Shibuya shopping district in Tokyo on February 24, 2020. Finance has traditionally been looked down on in Japan. Photo: Reuters Pedestrians in the Shibuya shopping district in Tokyo on February 24, 2020. Finance has traditionally been looked down on in Japan. Photo: Reuters
Pedestrians in the Shibuya shopping district in Tokyo on February 24, 2020. Finance has traditionally been looked down on in Japan. Photo: Reuters
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Anthony Rowley

Anthony Rowley

Anthony Rowley is a veteran journalist specialising in Asian economic and financial affairs. He was formerly Business Editor and International Finance Editor of the Hong Kong-based Far Eastern Economic Review and worked earlier on The Times newspaper in London